Alexander Brodie Galley Stove (Part 1 of 2)


Note:- Part 1 gives a description of the Brodie Galley Stove; Part 2 will explain the building of the model stove for H.M.S. Fly.

PART 1 below or Skip Here to get to section 2 the build!

Originally it was thought that H.M.S. Fly would have had a Brodie galley stove, and initial research was undertaken. Further investigations revealed that this was not possible; Brian Lavery in his book "The arming and fitting of English ships of war 1600 - 1815" (Conway Maritime, 1987) writes, "The Brodie stove began to replace the old type of iron firehearth in the 1780's. In 1781 the dockyard officers were ordered to buy no more 'firehearths of the old construction, as the Navy Board was 'intending to enter into a contract with Mr. Brodie for fire hearths of a new construction'."

H.M.S. Fly was launched in 1776, so she was built with an 'iron hearth'.

Probably the most famous replica of the Brodie stove is on H.M.S. Victory - Portsmouth, UK. This was built as a 'non-working' mock up and presented to the Victory by Sir Philip Watts when the ship was restored to the Trafalgar condition, 1922-8 (Bugler p.78). An extract from Buglers book, "H.M.S. Victory, Building, restoration and repair" is displayed below. (Source - National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London, UK)

Whilst the Brodie stove is not relevant to H.M.S. Fly, this information could be useful for modellers wishing to incorporate one into the appropriate model.

'LINK for the Brodie stove Patent Application '

Brodie Stove Patent.pdf

RESEARCH DOCUMENT

Brodie Stove Doc 1
Brodie Stove Doc 1

Brodie Stove Doc 2
Brodie Stove Doc 2

Brodie Stove Doc 3
Brodie Stove Doc 3

Brodie Stove Doc 4
Brodie Stove Doc 4

Brodie Stove Doc 5
Brodie Stove Doc 5

Brodie Stove Doc 6
Brodie Stove Doc 6

Brodie Stove Doc 7
Brodie Stove Doc 7

IMPORTANT NOTE: - H.M.S. Fly is an excellent model without the 'excursions' of 'Modelling for God', so the question could be asked, "why do it?" For this author it is a challenge in modelling, and if shared, makes it even more rewarding. This stove is an excellent example, and when completed very little of it will be visible within the forecastle. A glimpse may be seen through the gun ports, or an open door to the forecastle, yet there will be much detail in the building. This author believes that in these glimpses, which fuels the imagination, realism is added to the finished build.

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Alexander Brodie Galley Stove (Part 2 of 2)

This is an example of one method that has been used to replicate the Brodie Galley Stove for a 1:64 scale model. Initially it was made for H.M.S. Fly until research revealed that the Brodie Stove would not have been fitted. Examples of 'completed' stoves can be viewed on the Internet, but no instructions for their construction have been found. It is for this reason that these guidance notes have been published to help other modellers.

From trying to understanding how the stove operated, it was possible to build a simple model. Other than the information that was found in 'Part 1', all assumptions to its internal construction are this authors view only, and no guarantee can be made to its accuracy.

Using the plans in 'Part 1' from Arthur Buglers book, ' H.M.S. Victory, Building restoration and repair', a 1:64 scale stove could be drawn, Figure N1. From the original ship plans of H.M.S. Fly, the stove is shown to occupy an area in the forecastle of 1,392 mm x 1,104 mm (54.80 inches x 43.46 inches), and is situated in the space between the 'Supports for Riding Bitts Pt No 57'; it is on these measurements that the plan below are based.

Important Amendment:-
The dimensions of galley stoves depend upon the type of ship they were destined for. Modellers should therefore build their model stoves according to the scale dimensions for the ship being built. Brian Lavery in his book, "The arming and fitting of English ships of war 1600 -1815 (Conway Maritime, 1987 [Batsford, National Trust and Conway Anova Books]) p.198, provides a table of these dimensions, and this is below.

It has been pointed out to this author that there is a debate as to whether the dimensions given in Arthur Buglers "H.M.S. Victory: building restoration and repair" p.77 are correct; Victory is a 100 gun first-rate ship.

Source: Batsford, National Trust and Conway Anova Books]) p.198
Source: Batsford, National Trust and Conway Anova Books]) p.198


Plan for 1:64 scale 'Brodie Stove' drawn 1:1
Figure N1 - Plan for 1:64 scale 'Brodie Stove' drawn 1:1

NOTE

To print image - N1 please use this 'PDF N1 Brodie plans' the plans in the picture above will not print at 1:1 scale directly for this web page. Ensure that the print scale is set to 100% , when printing PDF Figure N1/N2

Figure N2 - To print the plan 'one to one', ensure print scale is set to 100%
Figure N2 - Plan for 1:64 scale 'Brodie Stove' drawn 1:1

To visualise what the stove could have looked liked the following images were studied, Figure's N3, N4, N5, N6 and N7.

View looking to Port
Figure N3 - View looking to Port


View looking to Port
Figure N4 - View looking to Por


View looking forward
Figure N5 - View looking forward


View looking to starboard
Figure N6 - View looking to starboard


To understand how the stove may have functioned an idea is drawn in Figure N7- Note this is a suggestion only.

Figure N7 - Suggestion of how the Brodie stove may have operated
Figure N7 - Suggestion of how the Brodie stove may have operated

The spit is turned by the 'Smoke-jack' operated by the hot flue gasses; this method of rotating a spit was commonly used in large kitchens, Figure N8.

Figure N8 - Smoke-jack turning a spit in front of kitchen fire
Figure N8 - Smoke-jack turning a spit in front of kitchen fire.

Source:- http://www.lookandlearn.com/history-images/M815950/How-the-Smoke-Jack-Turned-the-Spit?img=141&search=press&bool=phrase

The plan was drawn without any idea of how it was going to be constructed. In reality there will be some variations to the dimensions shown in the plan, mainly to accommodate the material that is commonly available, so making it simpler to build.

Using Figure N7 as a guide, the main body of the stove Figure N9, is constructed from  15 mm x 15 mm pine Figure N10.

Figure N9 - Cross-section of main body of stove
Figure N9 - Cross-section of main body of the Brodie stove.


Figure N10 - 15 mm x 15 mm pine
Figure N10 - 15 mm x 15 mm pine

The wood needs to be cut square, and this author used the following method. The 20 mm long section is marked using a ruler and 'set square' on all four sides, Figure N11 and N12.

Figure N11 - Pine marked using a 'set square'
Figure N11 - Pine marked using a 'set square'


Figure N12 - Pine marked on all 4 sides
Figure N12 - Pine marked on all 4 sides

The pine is successively cut a little at a time on each side with a 'junior' hacksaw, Figures N13, N14 and N15. A new saw blade was used at the start of this operation.

Figure N13 - 'Junior' hacksaw used to cut the pine
Figure N13 - 'Junior' hacksaw used to cut the pine


Figure N14 - Pine is successively cut a little at a time on each of its four side
Figure N14 - Pine is successively cut a little at a time on each of its four sides.


Figure N15 - Pine is squarely cut
Figure N15 - Pine is squarely cut.

The open fire is cut into one end of the 20 mm pine section; this is acived using a rotary sanding disc attachment for the craft drill. These can be purchased from any Model or DIY shop. This author cuts his own sanding discs and fits to the attachment with two side sticky tape Figures N16, N17 and N18.

Figure N16 - Sanding disc attachment and sand paper
Figure N16 - Sanding disc attachment and sand paper.


Figure N17 - Round disc cut from the sand paper and two sided
Figure N17 - Round disc cut from the sand paper and double sided tape on back.


Figure N18 - Disc stuck to rotary sanding attachment
Figure N18 - Disc stuck to rotary sanding attachment.

The craft drill is fitted in its stand with the rotary sanding attachment Figure N19.

Figure N19 - Craft drill fitted into stand
Figure N19 - Craft drill fitted into stand..


The shape of open fire end of the pine section is created using the rotary sander; needle files and sandpaper is used to finalise the shape Figure N20

Figure N20 - Open fire end created in the pine section
Figure N20 - Open fire end created in the pine section

The finished pine section is similar in shape to the cross-section shown in Figure N9 Figure N21.

Figure N21 - Open fire end of the pine section
Figure N21 - Open fire end of the pine section.


The sides of the stove are made from scraps of deck planking Figure N22. Clear sticky tape is put onto the cutting mat and odd strips of 0.5 x 3 mm Tanganyika (deck planking) are glued side-by-side. To ensure that they are held together, clear sticky tape joins each plank together, Figure N23. The first plank is pushed against the edge of a ruler

Figure N22 - Odd pieces of deck planking
Figure N22 - Odd pieces of deck planking


Figure N23 - Planks held together with clear sticky tape
Figure N23 - Planks held together with clear sticky tape

When dry, the planks are carefully lifted from the clear sticky tape, and a set square and a block of wood is used to mark a square line across the planks Figure N24 and Figure N25. The block of wood below the planks helps to support them when the line is being drawn. This enables square edges to be cut which is very important for something that is so small.

Figure N24 - Square line being drawn on the planks
Figure N24 - Square line being drawn on the planks.


Figure N25 - Square edge drawn on the planks
Figure N25 - Square edge drawn on the planks.

The correct sizes are drawn and cut for the side's of the oven Figure N26, and then they are both glued to the side of the pine section Figure N27.

Figure N26 - Planks are cut to the correct size for the side's of the stove
Figure N26 - Planks are cut to the correct size for the side's of the Brodie stove.


Figure N27 - Sides are glued to the stove
Figure N27 - Sides are glued to the Brodie stove.

This process is repeated and a further two sides are fitted to the stove Figure N28.

Figure N28 - Further two side's glued to the stove
Figure N28 - Further two side's glued to the Brodie stove.

The external width of the stove is approximately 16.25 mm, compared to the plan which is 17 mm.

The bottom part of the open fire end is fitted; this is approximately 2.5 mm in width Figure N29.

Figure N29 - Bottom part of the open fire is cut to size
Figure N29 - Bottom part of the open fire is cut to size (photograph was taken before two sides were fitted to the stove)

The smoke hood is made next, which requires a little patience; use the plans as a guide to how it will look. First a 6 mm section is cut from the 15 mm square pine; lime wood strips are glued either side, and the opening of the smoke hood are drawn on this 6 mm section Figure N30.

Figure N30 - Smoke hood
Figure N30 - Smoke hood

The smoke hood is held in a medium sized 'bull dog' clip Figure N31. A selection of mini craft drill routers were used to create the uptake in the hood Figure N32.

Figure N31 - Smoke hood held in 'bull dog clip'
Figure N31 - Smoke hood held in 'bull dog clip'.

The corners were carefully removed with a chisel craft knife Figure N33.

Figure N32 - A selection of craft drill routers were used
Figure N32 - A selection of craft drill routers were used


Figure N33 - The top corners of the smoke hood are removed
Figure N33 - The top corners of the smoke hood are removed

The hood is shaped according to the plan; securely holding it in place will aid this process and a method is suggested using a bulldog clip Figure N34; it can then be shaped Figure N35, and the finished smoke hood is shown in Figure N36.

Figure N34 - Smoke hood held with a bulldog clip
Figure N34 - Smoke hood held with a bulldog clip


Figure N35 - Smoke hood is shaped
Figure N35 - Smoke hood is shaped


Figure N36 - Shaped smoke hood
Figure N36 - Shaped smoke hood

A feature of the Brodie stove is that three separate fires can be lit in its open grate; two fire dividers are cut from deck planking Figure N37 and fitted Figure N38.

Figure N37 - Fire dividers for open fire
Figure N37 - Fire dividers for open fire


Figure N38 - Fire dividers fitted
Figure N38 - Fire dividers fitted

Fire bars are made from 0.3 mm brass rod; these are available from model or DIY shops. Otherwise use a heavy duty fuse wire and paint it gold. A 80 gauge twist drill is required to drill holes; these are available in a 'Microbox Wire Gauge HSS Twist Drills Nos. 61 - 80 set' - again from any model shop or DIY store. The fire bars will be spaced at approximately 1 mm intervals Figure N39, and six will be fitted Figure N40.

Note: Care should be taken when drilling the holes to ensure that they are evenly space; this authors first attempt were not so evenly spaced!!

Figure N39 - Holes are spaced at 1 mm intervals and then drilled
Figure N39 - Holes are spaced at 1 mm intervals and then drilled


Figure N40 - Fire bars fitted
Figure N40 - Fire bars fitted

Note:- This author found the 0.3 mm metal rod was relatively easy to insert from the outside of the stove side, but where it threaded through from the inside, a pair of tweezers were required to guide the rod into the hole.

A small amount of super glue is squeezed onto a piece of paper; a pin is dipped into it and a small amount was sparingly brushed along the holes and the fire dividers, so fixing them in place. The excess wires are removed with a pair of nail clippers Figure N41, and the fire bars are completed Figure N41.

Figure N41 - Nail clippers are used to remove excess metal rods
Figure N41 - Nail clippers are used to remove excess metal rods


Figure N42 - Completed fire bars
Figure N42 - Completed fire bars

The smoke hood is glued to the Brodie stove Figure N43

Figure N43 - Smoke hood glued on stove
Figure N43 - Smoke hood glued on stove

The smoke hood now has its final shaping, creating a finer appearance; for this a 'diamond' grinding tool is used Figure N44 and N45. Note:- Prior to its shaping, use a coat of 'sealer' or something similar to help strengthen the wood. This helps prevent it from splitting.

Figure N44 - Smoke hood ready for final shaping
Figure N44 - Smoke hood ready for final shaping


Figure N45 - Diamond grinder used for final shaping of smoke hood
Figure N45 - Diamond grinder used for final shaping of smoke hood

A copy of the plan Figure N1 is printed 1:1 scale and the two sides, end and top are cut out Figure N46.

Figure N46 - Parts of the plan are cut out
Figure N46 - Parts of the plan are cut out.

These parts are then stuck on the part-completed stove; the reason for doing this was to ensure that the oven doors, lids, etc would line up correctly. At this scale any mistake is instantly noticeable. The pieces of the plan were fixed to the Brodie stove with diluted PVA adhesive Figure N47

Figure N47 - Parts of the plan glued to the stove
Figure N47 - Parts of the plan glued to the Brodie stove

For creating the oven doors, ash grate door, boilers and lids odd scraps of wood are used.

The two boilers are cut from 3 mm ply; one lid is cut from 1 mm ply and the other from 1 mm Walnut planking Figure N48; the position of the handles are marked on the lids

Figure N48 - Boiler's and lids cut from scraps of wood; position of handles marked
Figure N48 - Boiler's and lids cut from scraps of wood; position of handles marked

The lids are positioned and glued onto the boiler tops Figure N49.

Figure N49 - Lids glued to boiler tops
Figure N49 - Lids glued to boiler tops

The handles are made from 0.3 mm brass rod and the holes are drilled using  80 gauge twist drill. The rod is bent using a pair of small flat nosed pliers, whose width are 2 mm, which is ideal for creating the handles Figures N50 and N51.

Figure N50 - Handle being bent Figure N51 - Flat nosed pliers used
Figure N50 - Handle being bent Figure N51 - Flat nosed pliers used

The handles are cut to the correct length with nail clippers and inserted into the drilled holes in the lid Figure N52; a drop of super glue is put on a scrap of paper, and with a pin a small amount is brushed around the bases of each handle to secure them

Figure N52 - Handles inserted into lids; superglue is brushed around bases to fix   handles
Figure N52 - Handles inserted into lids; superglue is brushed around bases to fix handles

The boiler tops have diagonal strengthening, which is shown on the plan Figure N1; these are replicated on the model with 0.2 mm brass rod.

The boiler top is prevented from moving by fixing onto two sided sticky tape; the brass rod is held on a 3 mm piece of ply that is also secured with two sided tape. The brass rod is positioned, fixed with masking tape and super glue is brushed over the area of the rod that is contact with the wooden boiler top, with a pin Figure N53

Figure N53 - Brass rod super glued to boiler top
Figure N53 - Brass rod super glued to boiler top.

The brass rod is cut with nail clippers Figure N54.

Figure N54 - Brass rod cut with nail clippers
Figure N54 - Brass rod cut with nail clippers.

The above process is repeated for all four corners of both boiler tops; the excess brass rods are clipped off and a needle file is used to smooth the end of each rod Figure N55.

Figure N55 - Completed boiler tops with lids, handles and strengthening
Figure N55 - Completed boiler tops with lids, handles and strengthening.

Loosely positioning the boiler tops on the stove gives an indication of what it will look like Figure N56.

Figure N56 - Boiler tops loosely positioned on stove
Figure N56 - Boiler tops loosely positioned on Brodie stove.

Doors for the oven, fire box and ash grate are made out of the 0.5 mm Tanganyika that was used for the oven sides Figure N57.

Figure N57 - Oven, fire box and ash grate doors
Figure N57 - Oven, fire box and ash grate doors.

The shape of the doors are taken from Figure N3; note the side on which the hinges are positioned as hinges will be fitted. A 1 mm strip of paper is cut and glued to the top and bottom of the fire box and oven doors, and for the ash grate door 0.5 mm paper strip is used Figure N58.

Figure N58 - Strips of paper glued to the oven, furnace box and ash grate door's
Figure N58 - Strips of paper glued to the oven, furnace box and ash grate door's.

The hinges are replicated using 0.4 mm brass rod; for the oven and fire box doors the rod is cut using  nail clippers into approximately 1.25 mm lengths. A small amount of PVA adhesive is applied to the underside of the excess paper strip, and the paper is then folded around the rod. When the glue is dry the excess paper is removed with a craft knife.

For the ash grate door hinges the brass rod is cut into  approximately 0.25 lengths and the excess paper folded around. This is an extremely fiddly operation and this author has only attempted this to see if it were possible to achieve Figure N59.

Figure N59 - Brass rod used to replicate the hinges on the door's
Figure N59 - Brass rod used to replicate the hinges on the door's.

Two hanging gantries are made from 0.3 mm brass rod and 0.6 mm o.d. x o.4 mm i.d. brass tube Figure N60.

Figure N60 - Hanging gantry
Figure N60 - Hanging gantry

To position the gantries in place, hold it in place with a pair of tweezers (not shown);  then hold the brass tube with a pair of self closing tweezers Figure N61.

Figure N61 - Holding the gantry in place for gluing
Figure N61 - Holding the gantry in place for gluing.

It can be seen that in Figure N61 the stove is held on a block of wood to prevent movement, whilst the tweezers are being held in place. Prior to gluing wrap one side of the tweezers arm in clear sticky tape, so preventing the P.V.A. from sticking to the tweezers Figure N62.

Using a sewing pin, apply a small amount of P.V.A. adhesive to the brass tube and the wood. Leave for approximately 30 minutes and carefully remove the tweezers. The P.V.A. will still be a little 'tacky', so the gantry can be re-positioned if needed.

After several hours apply more P.V.A. adhesive Figure N62.

Figure N62 - More P.V.A. adhesive applied
Figure N62 - More P.V.A. adhesive applied.


Figure N63 - Further P.V.A. adhesive is applied
Figure N63 - Further P.V.A. adhesive is applied.

The hanging gantries will swing 'in and out' Figure N64.

Figure N64 - Swinging hanging gantries fitted to stove
Figure N64 - Swinging hanging gantries fitted to stove.

There are probably many different ways that the 'spit mechanism' could be constructed, and the following is an insight as to how this author approached the solution. Initially it was considered using Tanganyika deck planks for the two spit brackets either side of the stove, but after several experiments it proved too difficult to shape them. Viewing Figure N3 it was decided to experiment with brass rod, and to assemble the side brackets so they would be similar, and this proved to be very effective. Initially super glue and PVA adhesive was used Figure N65, but it was thought to look 'clumsy'. Soldering was attempted Figure N66, and this proved more promising, so this method is now described.

Figure N65 - Spit brackets assembled using superglue and P.V.A. adhesive
Figure N65 - Spit brackets assembled using superglue and P.V.A. adhesive


Figure N66 - Spit bracket assembles with soldering
Figure N66 - Spit bracket assembles with soldering

Using 0.3 mm brass rod, the end was bent at right angles Figure N67, and sticky taped to a piece of flat wood.

Figure N67 - 0.3 mm brass rod bent at right angles
Figure N67 - 0.3 mm brass rod bent at right angles.

The first 'hook' for the bracket was bent and sticky taped into position Figure N68, then the second Figure N69 and then the third Figure N70.

Figure N68 - First hooked road laid in position
Figure N68 - First hooked road laid in position.


Figure N69 - Second hooked rod is laid into position
Figure N69 - Second hooked rod is laid into position.


Figure N70 - Third hooked rod laid into position
Figure N70 - Third hooked rod laid into position.

A little soldering flux is smeared over the four rods that are to be soldered Figure N71.

Figure N71 - Soldering flux smeared over brass rods
Figure N71 - Soldering flux smeared over brass rods.

Important: When using the 'mini' electric soldering tool, ensure that all safety precautions supplied with the tool are followed.

A little drop of solder is placed on the hot tip Figure N72, then this is applied to the brass rods to be soldered Figure N73.

Figure N72 - A drop of molten solder on the soldering tool
Figure N72 - A drop of molten solder on the soldering tool.


Figure N73 - Brass rods soldered
Figure N73 - Brass rods soldered

The soldered brass rods are cut away from the wood, sticky tape and the excess rods are removed with a pair of nail clippers Figure N74.

Figure N74 - Wood, sticky tape and excess brass rods are removed
Figure N74 - Wood, sticky tape and excess brass rods are removed.

The brackets side supports are made from two brass tubes cut 2.5 mm in length and 0.6 mm o.d. x 0.4 mm i.d. Figure N75. When cutting ensure that the 0.3 mm brass rod is inside the tube, as this will prevent it from being squashed when cut; the tube end is filled so the rod can be inserted through the tube.

Figure N75 - Two side brackets for spit
Figure N75 - Two side brackets for spit

This is then fixed to the side of the Brodie stove with P.V.A. according to the plan Figure N1.

Figure N76 - Spit brackets fitted to side of stove according to the plan
Figure N76 - Spit brackets fitted to side of Brodie stove according to the plan.

Please see Figures N86 and N87 and accompanying note.

The smoke jack and spit pulleys are made from 'beads', which were obtained from the local craft store. It was not sure which ones would be suitable so a range of shapes and sizes were purchased Figure N77

Figure N77 - An assortment of sizes and shapes of beads
Figure N77 - An assortment of sizes and shapes of beads.

The spit pulley was made from a round bead approximately 4.5 mm diameter. A drop of superglue was put on the end of a round toothpick and secured pushed on. The bead was inserted  in the craft drill and a craft knife was used to shape the spit pulley Figure N78. The craft drill was in effect being used as a 'makeshift' lathe.

Note: Do wear safety glasses in the event the craft blade breaks.

Figure N78 - Craft drill adapted as a bench lathe to shape the pulleys
Figure N78 - Craft drill adapted as a bench lathe to shape the pulleys.

For the pulley chain the thinnest that was available from the local jeweller was purchased, and it was made to fit Figure N79.

Figure N79 - Spit pulley shaped to fit necklace chain
Figure N79 - Spit pulley shaped to fit necklace chain.

The protruding part of the toothpick is cut away from the bead, but the super glued tip of the toothpick will remain in the centre. A 0.6 mm brass rod is used for the spit; the centre of the bead is drilled using a 74 gauge twist drill, and superglue is used to fix the rod; the spit is cut to the correct length Figure N80.

Figure N80 - Completed spit, pulley and chain
Figure N80 - Completed spit, pulley and chain.

A smaller wider bead is selected for the smoke jack pulley, and the same process is repeated. The brass rod used for the smoke jack is 0.4 mm, so the centre of the bead is drilled using a 78 gauge twist drill; the chain groove is slightly wider Figure N81.

Figure N81 - Smoke jack pulley and chain
Figure N81 - Smoke jack pulley and chain.

The stove chimney is made 6 mm diameter and in reality anything could be used. The height will depend upon the model in which it will be fitted, and a small hole for the smoke jack pulley rod to be inserted is made in the side Figure N82. The chimney is then fitted on the Brodie stove Figure 83.

Figure N82 - Chimney for stove
Figure N82 - Chimney for stove.


Figure N83 - Chimney fitted to stove
Figure N83 - Chimney fitted to Brodie stove.

The excess brass rod on the spit side brackets are removed Figures N84 and N85. They are fixed into place with a drop of superglue or P.V.A. adhesive.

Figure N84 - Excess brass rods removed from spit brackets
Figure N84 - Excess brass rods removed from spit brackets


Figure N85 - Spit Brackets
Figure N85 - Spit Brackets.

Note:- This author failed to check properly that the spit brackets would hold the spit perfectly level, so consequently they had to be slightly bent Figures N86 and N87.

Figure N86 - Spit brackets had to be slightly bent after having fixed them
Figure N86 - Spit brackets had to be slightly bent after having fixed them


Figure N87 - Spit on the adjusted brackets
Figure N87 - Spit on the adjusted brackets

The smoke jack pulley was from 0.5 mm Walnut cut to a width of approximately 1.5 mm and a hole is drilled with a 78 gauge twist drill at the top for the pulley rod; it is with a spot of P.V.A. adhesive Figure N88.

Figure N88 - Smoke jack pulley support fitted
Figure N88 - Smoke jack pulley support fitted.

The smoke jack pulley and rod are fitted a superglue is brushed into the hole in the chimney to secure the pulley rod; the spit is also fitted and the chain checked between the two pulley's Figure N89.

Figure N89 - Smoke jack pulley is fitted with the chain to the spit
Figure N89 - Smoke jack pulley is fitted with the chain to the spit

This author made the condenser from a 'cable stitch' needle Figure N90, but anything similar will do; approximately 14 mm of the tip is removed and the ends 'squared' Figure N91

Figure N90 - Cable stitch needle (approximately 2.5 mm in diameter)
Figure N90 - Cable stitch needle (approximately 2.5 mm in diameter)

 

Figure N91 - Cable stitch needle ends squared
Figure N91 - Cable stitch needle ends squared

To represent the pipe from the boiler top the condenser 0.8 mm brass rod was bent at 90 degrees. The needle tip was held in the chuck of the craft drill, and a 67 gauge twist drill was held in a brass collet from the AMATI 'Action Kit 7383/20, positioned at the centre of the needle, held still, and a hole drilled Figure N92.

Figure N92 - Holed drilled in end of cable needle
Figure N92 - Holed drilled in end of cable needle.

The right angled brass rod is super glued into the end of the needle Figure N93.

Figure N93 - Completed condenser
Figure N93 - Completed condenser.

A thin card strip 0.5 mm wide, is cut and stuck around the top edge of the Brodie stove Figure N94.

Figure N94 - Thin strip of card is stuck around the top of the stove
Figure N94 - Thin strip of card is stuck around the top of the Brodie stove.

The hanging rail around the top of the stove can be fitted using a variety of methods, and the following is one solution.

There are two individual 'bent' rails Figure N95, on the side of the stove, and one 'straight' rail across the back; 0.4 mm brass rod is used, and the corners will be soldered. This author created a 'dummy' stove just to get used to the method of fixing, them through 'trial and error', prior to fitting them to the actual model.

Figure N95 - Stove side rails
Figure N95 - Brodie Stove side rails.

Four holes are drilled using a 78 gauge twist drill, at approximately 45 degrees at the two top back corners of the stove edge, and two shallow ones approximately 2 mm from the front corner behind the smoke jack pulley. Those on the back stove can be deeper.

A support is made to hold the back rod whilst it is being soldered in place, to the two side rails Figure N96

Figure N96 - Support for back rail whilst it is being soldered to the side rails
Figure N96 - Support for back rail whilst it is being soldered to the side rails.

The two side rails are positioned; be sure to check that they are evenly placed on both sides. A spot of superglue applied with a pin can be put where the brass rod enters the hole. Alternatively it can be done after the soldering has been completed. The brass rod is positioned and sticky taped to the support Figure N96, and then placed beside the back corners of the side rails Figure N97.  Soldering flux is put on the corners to be soldered Figure N97, and then the solder is applied Figure N98. The excess rod is removed with nail clippers and the corners smoothed with a needle file Figure N99.

Figure N97 - Positioning the back rail and apply solder to the corners
Figure N97 - Positioning the back rail and apply solder to the corners.


Figure N98 - Rail corners are soldered
Figure N98 - Rail corners are soldered


Figure N99 - Completed hanging rail around top of stove
Figure N99 - Completed hanging rail around top of Brodie stove

The feet are fitted to the bottom of the stove; to ensure that they are all level the stove is placed on a small piece of wood 1mm or 2 mm thickness depending on how high the stove is off the deck.

Figure N100 - Feet are put on the stove
Figure N100 - Feet are put on the Brodie stove.

Masking tape partly covers the position were the boilers will be fixed. When the painting is completed they are removed and it will help position the boilers Figure N101.

Figure N101 - Masking tape covers the position of the boilers
Figure N101 - Masking tape covers the position of the boilers.

Spray 'Etch Primer' is applied as an initial coat of paint to enable the paint to adhere to the brass components. It is strongly recommended that an odd piece of wood is practised on first, to obtain a 'feel' as to how to apply the spray. ONLY PRESS FOR HALF OR ONE SECOND BURSTS. Spray about 12 inches away, and let the spray settle on the stove. Do a little at a little at a time; allow it to dry, and then move its position. This author used a small box, placed the stove inside and then sprayed; this help contained the paint spray Figure N102 and N103 and the fully primed stove Figure N104. The boiler tops, spit and condenser are also primed Figure N105.

Figure N102 - Stove painted inside an opened box
Figure N102 - Brodie Stove painted inside an opened box.


Figure 103 - Stove sprayed a little at a time
Figure 103 - Brodie Stove sprayed a little at a time


Figure N104 - Stove completely primed
Figure N104 - Brodie Stove completely primed


Figure N105 - Condenser, boiler tops and spit primed
Figure N105 - Condenser, boiler tops and spit primed

A 64 gauge hole is made in the larger boiler top for the condenser Figure N106.

Figure N106 - Condenser fitted into boiler top to check fit
Figure N106 - Condenser fitted into boiler top to check fit.

Experiment with odd pieces of wood on which printed paper has been glued, to replicate the actual Brodie stove. Three colours were tested, 1 - Enamel Spray Paint Matt Black (www.halfords.com); 2 - Halfords 'artfx' Dark Grey; 3 - Humbrol Acrylic Spray Black Satin 85 (www.humbrol.com)  Figure N107.

Figure N107 - Testing colours for spraying the stove
Figure N107 - Testing colours for spraying the Brodie stove.

for the UK builders No.2 Halfords 'artfx' Dark Grey presented the most realistic colour against Figure N4. For other countries you will have to experiment to find the correct color.

Spray in very short 'bursts' and from a distance; only a very thin coating is required to avoid the paint being too heavily applied, especially around the front fire grate; remove the masking tape on the boiler tops Figure N108.

Figure N108 - Masking tape removed from boiler tops
Figure N108 - Masking tape removed from boiler tops.

The boiler tops and spit are painted and the condenser is painted Humbrol MET 55 and allowed 24 hours to dry.

Much thought was given to the base of the stove and various materials were experimented with. The base Figure N3 was used as a reference, and eventually it was found that a printed design Figure N109, produced the best effect. This was glued to a thin card with 'PRITT Stick' glue (Henkel Ltd); this was used as it is a thick adhesive, and so created a slight texture beneath the printed design. It has a coat of 'Flat Matt Varnish' painted on the printed surface, as this also created a 'dimensional' effect. The completed base has strips of Tanganyika glued around its edge Figure N110.

Figure N109 - Printed design for stove base
Figure N109 - Printed design for Brodie stove base.

You will also need to print the base pattern at 100%:

Printable PDF Base Pattern for N109

Figure N110 - Printed tiled base for stove
igure N110 - Printed tiled base for Brodie stove

At the front of the Brodie stove there is a tray to catch the dripping fat from the spit. This is made from Tanganyika Figure N111 and N112.

Figure N111 - Tanganyika is used to make drip tray
Figure N111 - Tanganyika is used to make drip tray


Figure N112 - Completed drip tray ready for painting
Figure N112 - Completed drip tray ready for painting

The drip tray is primed and spray painted Figure N113

Figure N113 - Primed and painted drip tray
Figure N113 - Primed and painted drip tray.

The chain between the smoke jack and spit pulley is made from the think necklace chain; for doing this it is suggested that a table mounted magnifying glass is used. Doing this is very much by 'trial and error', but this author will describe a way in which it is achievable.

Cut a single link it two with a chisel craft knife on a cutting mat, and then hold this single link with a pair of tweezers Figure N114.

Figure N114 - Single link held with tweezers
Figure N114 - Single link held with tweezers.

The length of the chain is estimated, but again this will be a trial and error process until the correct length is achieved. One end is put onto the link Figure N115, and then the other is attached and the link is closed using mini pliers.

Figure N115 - One end of the chain is hooked onto the split link
Figure N115 - One end of the chain is hooked onto the split link

The various components of the Brodie stove are assembled; using a pin, the spit and chain are fixed with a very small amount of superglue. The boiler tops are fixed using spots of P.V.A. adhesive and then the condenser is finally fitted Figure N116.

Figure N116 - All the components assembled on the stove
Figure N116 - All the components assembled on the Brodie stove

The stove is then placed upon the tiled base and the drip tray is fitted in front of the fire grate Figure N117.

Figure N117 - Stove is placed on tiled base with drip tray in front
Figure N117 - Brodie Stove is placed on tiled base with drip tray in front.


This author liked the idea of a fire glowing in the grates as shown in Figure N5. A red plastic bead cord was used Figure N118, and this was chopped up into small pieces Figure N119

Figure N118 - Red plastic cord for bead making
Figure N118 - Red plastic cord for bead making.


Figure N119- Plastic bead cord cut up into small pieces
Figure N119 - Red plastic cord cut into small pieces.

Using tweezers, the small pieces of plastic are put into the two outside fire hearth's, to replicate Figure N5. If these are required to be permanent, use a small amount of Flat Matt Varnish painted on the top level of the plastic pieces to keep them in place; when the varnish dries it will not be seen. The completed Brodie stove with the glowing fire grates is an alternative presentation Figure N120.

Figure N120 - Stove with glowing embers in the fire grate
Figure N120 - Brodie Stove with glowing embers in the fire grate.

Two views of the stove are shown in Figures N121 and N122.

Figure N121 - View of stove
Figure N121 - View of Brodie stove


Figure N122 - View of stove
Figure N122 - View of Brodie stove


Lloyd Matthews – April 2014 ©

Hand ClapWhat a fantastic build!! Thank you very much Lloyd for this Hand Clapcomprehensive Brodie Stove scratch build. I know we have both searched the internet for this very item with no luck. NOW we all have a place to find what we need.

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