Capstan

I made up the Capstan according to the instructions but found some errors within the text. Below is a detailed method on producing the Capstan with points made to the errors within the H.M.S. Fly instructions.

This has been produced by Lloyd Matthews and there is a PDF available at the end of this help section.


Lloyd Matthews – August 2013 ©

The author stresses that this is only one interpretation of assembling the capstan, and should be used as a guide only.

The parts for the capstan are identified, and removed from the 1.5mm Walnut Ply sheet, Figure H1; any burrs or notches are removed.

Figure H1 - Parts for two capstans
Figure H1 - Parts for two capstans

There is a misprint in the pictorial instruction booklet, which states that the main spine for the capstan is 8mm, whilst it is actually 10mm, but the correct size dowel is supplied. For item Pt. No 105 there are 5 pieces, yet this author only required 4 to assemble two capstans.

Page 7 of the instruction booklet instructs that Red Humbrol matt 60 is mixed with 25% Red Humbrol matt 70; a small jam container was correspondingly filled, for painting the capstan etc., Figure H2. The quarter marks on the side of the bottle were used to fill the paint to the correct proportions; the paint shown above the markings covering the glass occurred when mixing the paint. An '00' brush was used for painting the parts of the capstan.

The 100 mm spine dowel needs to be sanded evenly around its diameter, Figure H3, to enable Pt. No 105 and 106 to fit on the spine, Figure H4. It was found that using a fabric backed sandpaper was easier to use.

Figure H2 - Small jar to mix the Humbrol paint
Figure H2 - Small jar to mix the Humbrol paint

 

Figure H3 - Reducing diameter of spine; sandpaper held between thumb and forefinger
Figure H3 - Reducing diameter of spine; sandpaper held between thumb and forefinger


Figure H4 - Pt. No 105 and 106 slide onto spine
Figure H4 - Pt. No 105 and 106 slide onto spine

Pt. No 106 and two Pt's. No. 105 are glued; these parts are positioned on the end of the spine whilst the glue is drying, Figure H5.

Note: - Use a minimal amount of glue only, otherwise it will be difficult to remove the excess.

Figure H5 - Pt's. 105 and 106 positioned on end of spine
Figure H5 - Pt's. 105 and 106 positioned on end of spine

The instructions state that the spine should be cut to a length of 22 mm, this is not correct. This author found that a length of 20 mm was adequate. If a 22 mm spine is used, the capstan on the gun deck level will not fit below Pt. No 9a deck support frame, and will need to be cut to a length of 20 mm to fit under the beam, Figure H6.

Figure H6 - Ensure the spine is the correct length to fit under deck support 9a
Figure H6 - Ensure the spine is the correct length to fit under deck support 9a

Pt. No 108, capstan pawls are required to be fitted evenly around the spine; it was felt that this detail was important as if the pawls were not evenly spaced, it would be quite noticeable on the poop deck. The method described below is this authors solution to solving the problem:

• using a micrometre the final spine diameter was measured as 9.8 mm
• the circumference was calculated as 22/7 x 9.8 = 30.79 mm
• pawl thickness is 1.5 mm x 8 pawls = 12 mm
• total pawl thickness 12 mm, subtracted from circumference 30.79 = 18.79 mm
• the space between each pawl is therefore 18.79 divided by 8 = 2.35 mm

Pieces of thin wood were then taped together to measure approximately 2.35 mm in thickness, to mark the position of the pawls on the spine, Figure H7.

Figure H7 - Pawls positions marked on the capstan spine
Figure H7 - Pawls positions marked on the capstan spine

The sides of the pawls were then painted with two coats of the mixed Humbrol red, Figure H8. It was found that having then stuck to masking tape made it easier.

Figure H8 - Sides of the pawls are painted
Figure H8 - Sides of the pawls are painted

Once both sides have been painted with two coats, it must be decided how to treat the facing edge of the pawls. This author considered that painting them red would not be realistic, and the burnt edge looked better, however, the ply layers could still be seen on some pawls. A coat of Walnut wood stain was painted along the edges of the pawls, which hid the ply layers, yet retained the look of 'naturalness', Figure H9.

Figure H9 - The facing edges of the pawls were coloured with Walnut wood stain
Figure H9 - The facing edges of the pawls were coloured with Walnut wood stain

The spines were given a coat of thinned red paint, Figure H10; in retrospect there was no real need to do this, as still two coats of paint were required, for finishing.

Figure H10 - Spies painted with thinned red paint
Figure H10 - Spies painted with thinned red paint

The capstan head is given two coats of red paint and fixed to the end of the spine, Figure H11. A small amount of adhesive is applied to the edge of the pawl, Figure H12, and is then aligned with the marked division on the spine, Figure 11.

Figure H11 - Capstan being assembled
Figure H11 - Capstan being assembled


Figure H12 - A minimal amount of glue is applied to the edge of the pawl
Figure H12 - A minimal amount of glue is applied to the edge of the pawl

Any excess adhesive is immediately removed with a pointed craft knife, whilst it is still wet. The bases of the capstan are given two coats of paint, Figure H13.

Figure H13 - Bases of the capstan painted
Figure H13 - Bases of the capstan painted.

The spine is given two coats of paint, Figure H14.

The spine is given two coats of paint, Figure H14.
Figure H14 - Capstan spine painted

A very small amount of adhesive is put on the base of each pawl, prior to fixing the base of the capstan, Figure H15.

Figure H15 - Adhesive is put on the base of each pawl
Figure H15 - Adhesive is put on the base of each pawl

The base is slid onto the spine and any excess adhesive is immediately removed and the capstan is completed, Figure H16 and H17.

Figure H16 - Completed capstan
Figure H16 - Completed capstan

 

Figure H17 - Completed capstan positioned below deck support frame 9a
Figure H17 - Completed capstan positioned below deck support frame 9a

Note: - It was noticed that the capstan pole holes looked a little 'odd' as they had not been painted. Using a "OOOOO" brush and Walnut wood stain, the inside of each hole was painted, Figure H18, which looked more realistic.

Figure H18 - The inside of the capstan pole holes are painted with Walnut wood stain
Figure H18 - The inside of the capstan pole holes are painted with Walnut wood stain

Lloyd Matthews – August 2013 ©

Need a PDF Here it is: Capstan PDF

Thank you Lloyd Matthews another great addition to the site..

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