H.M.S. Fly Gun Port Patterns

Gun Port Patterns (Part 1 of 2)

IMPORTANT: - For modeller's who have had no previous experience with the building of this type of vessel, please read the authors observations here'

Authors Note: - This section could be described as a "fly on the wall" description of preparing and fitting the gun port patterns. This was the first time this author had soaked and bent ply, so the process was very much one of 'discovery'. Mistakes were made, and the process of correcting those mistakes are also noted; modelling is very much learning from mistakes!

These guidance notes will incorporate the changes that have been made as a result of incorporating the Captain's Cabin into the model; they will be written in green text, so the modellers who are not constructing the Captain's Cabin can skip the section.

Prior to fixing the gun port patterns, this author completed several other tasks, which are detailed below: -

Having obtained the original plans of H.M.S. Fly, it can be seen that there was a hatch opening below the main deck grating. According to the Royal Maritime Museum Greenwich, this would have aided air ventilation through the lower decks. This hatch was not included as part of the instructions however, this author will add one for authenticity. Whilst not really visible on the model, it will just be seen through the main hatch gratings, and the suggestion that something is below, will add realism.

Rather than just sticking the deck grating to the deck, foil backing has been added Figure K1. To create the illusion that there is a hold below, the foil has been painted with a matt paint Figure K2. This author used an initial coat of Humbrol 53 and then a second coat of Humbrol MATT 74.

Backing foil for deck grating
Figure K1 - Backing foil for deck grating

Back of foil is painted
Figure K2 - Back of foil is painted

The foil is then glued to the reverse side of the deck grating Figure K3.

Figure K3 - Foil glued to back of deck grating.
Figure K3 - Foil glued to back of deck grating.

The deck grating is positioned against Pt. No 42 Main Mast Bitts/Gallows, and to ensure it is central to the deck opening a piece of deck planking is used as a spacer Figure K4. Do experiment to ensure the deck grating will be in the correct position.

Figure K4 - Deck grating is positioned central to the main hatch opening
Figure K4 - Deck grating is positioned central to the main hatch opening

When gluing the deck grating in place, only use a small amount of glue around the edge of the hatch and ensure none will come into contact with the main mast bitts, otherwise they will be difficult to remove. The deck grating is inserted into position using self closing tweezers Figure K5, and finally glued into position Figure K6.

Figure K5 - Deck grating placed in position using a pair of self closing tweezers
Figure K5 - Deck grating placed in position using a pair of self closing tweezers.


Figure K6 - Deck grating glued into position
Figure K6 - Deck grating glued into position.

Pt. No 18 Plank termin. patterns Figure K7, were glued into place Figure K8. These had previously been shaped in "08 - Preparing the Hull, Figure G35 Plank Termin. Patterns shaped at ends".

Figure K7 - Pt. No 18 Plank termin. patterns ready to be fitted
Figure K7 - Pt. No 18 Plank termin. patterns ready to be fitted.


Figure K8 - Pt. No 18 Plank termin. patterns fitted
Figure K8 - Pt. No 18 Plank termin. patterns fitted.

The fitting of the gun port patterns appears difficult, in particular the part where they come together at the bow; this author has attempted to eliminate the potential difficulties by making a "Gun port pattern bow retainer" (GPPBR). It must be stressed that this is only one method, and for the experienced modeller, there are probably easier ways of fixing them.

Cut a part section of the ply wood that holds Pt. No 33 Prow Figure K9, and fit onto the bow of the model Figure K19; note end position of gun port pattern.

Figure K9 - Section of ply that held the prow in the kit to create GPPBR
Figure K9 - Section of ply that held the prow in the kit to create GPPBR


Figure K10 - Section of ply fitted onto prow, and a 8 mm diameter pencil is acting as the bowsprit
Figure K10 - Section of ply fitted onto prow, & a 8 mm diameter pencil is acting as the bowsprit

Additional support is added for the gun port pattern at the bow Figure K11, which is made out of an odd piece of 3/8 inch flat wood. Ensure that the front bow curvature corresponds to Pt. No 29 Poop deck Figure K12 and K13.

Figure K11 - Supports added for the gun port patterns
Figure K11 - Supports added for the gun port patterns


Figure K12 - Gun port pattern supports have the same curvature as the poop deck
Figure K12 - Gun port pattern supports have the same curvature as the poop deck


Figure K13 - Gun port pattern supports follow the curvature of the poop deck
Figure K13 - Gun port pattern supports follow the curvature of the poop deck.

Side supports for the GPPBR are made from 25 mm x 2 mm strips Figure K14; this author used the wooden strips from an old IKEA 'venetian blind', which are kept as they always seem to be useful. Two are fixed either side of the GPPBR Figure K15, K16 and K17; it is very important that this gap is kept as tight as possible, so when inserting the gun port patterns they are pressed very tight against Pt. No 18 Plank termin. patterns.

Figure K14 - Side supports are fitted to the GPPBR
Figure K14 - Side supports are fitted to the GPPBR


Figure K15 - View of GPPBR showing two strips glued either side
Figure K15 - View of GPPBR showing two strips glued either side.


Figure K16 - View of GPPBR
Figure K16 - View of GPPBR.


Figure K17 - View of GPPBR and bowsprit
Figure K17 - View of GPPBR and bowsprit.

It is important to remember that the gun port patterns will be fixed with glue, and it is essential that none comes into contact with the GPPBR. For this reason clear sticky tape covers the parts of the GPPBR that are likely to come into contact with glue, and also the end of the bowsprit Figures K18 and K19.

Figure K18 - Clear sticky tape covering areas coming into contact with glue
Figure K18 - Clear sticky tape covering areas coming into contact with glue.


Figure K19 - Clear sticky tape covering the bowsprit
Figure K19 - Clear sticky tape covering the bowsprit.

To get a feel as to how the gun port patterns will lie on the hull, especially around the crucial bow area, and the GPPBR, cardboard patterns were made using an old cereal box. The gun port patterns were measured for thickness, and an equivalent was made up using spray mount, sticking the required layers of cereal box cardboard together. The actual gun port patterns outline were drawn on the cardboard, and the exact shapes cut out Figure K20. Two staples can be seen close to the bow, as these were added to prevent the cardboard from slipping.

Figure K20 - Cardboard gun port patterns
Figure K20 - Cardboard gun port patterns.

The following pictures are to give a feel of how the gun port patterns will be fitted Figures K21, K22, K23, K24, and was good practice prior to fitting the ply ones.

Figure K21 - Bow view showing how the GPPBR holds the patterns in position
Figure K21 - Bow view showing how the GPPBR holds the patterns in position.


Figure K22 - Internal side view of gun port pattern
Figure K22 - Internal side view of gun port pattern.


Figure K23 - Side view of GPPBR; importance of Figure K14 can be seen
Figure K23 - Side view of GPPBR; importance of Figure K14 can be seen.


Figure K24 - Specially made clips holding gun port patterns into position
Figure K24 - Specially made clips holding gun port patterns into position.


Figure K25 - Clip holding gun port pattern into position
Figure K25 - Clip holding gun port pattern into position.


Figure K26 - View showing the adjustments that will need to be made to the gun deck
Figure K26 - View showing the adjustments that will need to be made to the gun deck.

It was found that to first experiment with the cardboard gun port patterns highlights any potential problems prior to using the actual ply patterns.

Small bull dog clips were adapted to hold the gun port patterns into position Figure K27.

Figure K27 - Small bull dog clips showing two that have been modified
Figure K27 - Small bull dog clips showing two that have been modified.

As a result of above, adjustments were made to the edge of the gun deck Figure K28, and it can be seen that the bulkheads are now flush with the edge of the gun deck.

Figure K28 - Gun deck sanded flush with the bulkheads
Figure K28 - Gun deck sanded flush with the bulkheads.

It was found that the sanding tool that had been made was very useful for this task Figure K29. Note that the sandpaper is fixed to the wood with double sided sticky tape.

Figure K29 - Home made sanding tool
Figure K29 - Home made sanding tool.

A closer fit is obtained between the gun port pattern and the edge of the gun deck Figure 30.

Figure K30 - Closer fit is obtained between gun deck edge and gun port pattern
Figure K30 - Closer fit is obtained between gun deck edge and gun port pattern.

A piece of redundant ply from the kit was used to cut out the front part of one gun port pattern; there is a limit to the ply available, but it was found sufficient was available for the crucial bow section Figure K31, which could be experimented with prior to working on the actual gun patterns.

As can be read, experimentation is vital if this operation has not been carried out before!

Figure K31 - One gun port pattern cut out from redundant ply in the kit for experimentation
Figure K31 - One gun port pattern cut out from redundant ply in the kit for experimentation.

The gun port patterns were soaked in warm water for several hours, and then positioned on the hull. A variety of methods were used to hold them in position against the bulkheads Figures K32, K33 and K34; whichever method is used, experiment first. Whilst the above experiments may seem like 'overkill', they will help the less experienced builder become familiar with the various techniques.

Figure K32 - Holding the gun port patterns in position on the hull
Figure K32 - Holding the gun port patterns in position on the hull.


Figure K33 - Holding the gun port patterns in position on the hull
Figure K33 - Holding the gun port patterns in position on the hull.


Figure K34 - Holding the gun port patterns in position on the hull
Figure K34 - Holding the gun port patterns in position on the hull.

The wet gun port patterns were allowed to dry over two days before removing the tape and clips Figure K35.

Figure K35 - Gun port patterns shaped to the contour of the hull
Figure K35 - Gun port patterns shaped to the contour of the hull.

Along the edges of the gun port patterns the clips that were used to hold it place were quite strong, and distorted the smooth contour of the ply Figure K36. This was rectified by fixing small pieces of wood with two sided sticky tape to act as a fulcrum, and localized the wetting of the ply with tissue paper Figure K37. When the dry tissue had been put over the area to reshape, water from a syringe Figure K38 was applied to the tissue. Several hours were allowed for the ply to achieve the correct shape and then it was dried with a hair dryer on low heat.

Figure K36 - Section of gun port pattern to be reshaped
Figure K36 - Section of gun port pattern to be reshaped.


Figure K37 - Medium bull dog clip and wet tissues paper
Figure K37 - Medium bull dog clip and wet tissues paper.


Figure K38 - Cooking syringe used to wet tissue
Figure K38 - Cooking syringe used to wet tissue.

Fibre optic cables will need to be fed from the Captain's Cabin to the base of the hull; these will be fed between the side of the cabin (inner hull) and the gun port pattern. To create continuity, the inner hull was extended between bulkheads 8 to 11 Figure K40 and Figure K41; (please refer to 05 - Hull Modifications - Stern Section, Figure D52). Make sure that the planks between bulkheads 8 to 12 are all in line with the modified stern section Figure K39. Note: - An additional 3 metres of 1 x 4 mm Walnut was purchased.

Figure K39 - Planks between bulkhead 8 to 12 are all in line with modified stern section
Figure K39 - Planks between bulkhead 8 to 12 are all in line with modified stern section.


Figure K40 - Fibre optic cables will be fed between gun port pattern and cabin wall
Figure K40 - Fibre optic cables will be fed between gun port pattern and cabin wall.


Figure K41 - Inner hull completed between bulkheads 8 and 12
Figure K41 - Inner hull completed between bulkheads 8 and 12.

Special mention should be made for Pt. No 38 Deck beam for Bulkhead No. 8; clear sticky tape is placed around the end of the deck beam to prevent it from being stuck to the inner hull planks Figure K42. When the planking has been completed the deck beam can be easily removed Figure K43.

Figure K42 - Clear sticky tape put around the end of the deck beam
Figure K42 - Clear sticky tape put around the end of the deck beam.


Figure K43 - Top of bulkhead number 8
Figure K43 - Top of bulkhead number 8.

The inner hull and the modified stern section were given several coats of flat matt varnish. This is to prevent the wood from splitting when the gun port holes and windows for the Captain's Cabin are cut into the wood, and will be explained in detail in 14 - Gun Port Patterns (Part 2 of 2).

After the gun port patterns have been fixed, the exposed tabs of bulkheads 5, 6 and 7 will need to be removed prior to finishing the deck planking. These tabs are part cut before fitting the gun port patterns Figure K44.

Figure K44 - Tabs on bulkheads 5, 6 and 7 are partially cut
Figure K44 - Tabs on bulkheads 5, 6 and 7 are partially cut.

Only one gun port pattern was glued Figure K45, and when the adhesive had dried the second one was then fixed into position.

Figure K45 - First gun port pattern being glue into position
Figure K45 - First gun port pattern being glue into position.

After the glued had been given sufficient time to dry, the clips removed from the second gun port pattern, Figures K46 and K47.

Figure K46 - Both gun port patterns glued into position
Figure K46 - Both gun port patterns glued into position.


Figure K47 - Both gun port patterns glued into position
Figure K47 - Both gun port patterns glued into position.

There was approximately a 2 mm gap between the gun port pattern and bulkhead tabs 5, 6 and 7 Figure K48.

Figure K48 - Gap between bulkhead tans and gun port pattern
Figure K48 - Gap between bulkhead tans and gun port pattern.


Figure K49 - Dry tissue and backing timber
Figure K49 - Dry tissue and backing timber.


Figure K50 - Dry tissue is clamped onto gun port pattern and bulkhead tabs
Figure K50 - Dry tissue is clamped onto gun port pattern and bulkhead tabs.

Using the cooking syringe, water was then applied to the dry tissue, just sufficient so all the tissue was wet. This was done on the other side and the water allowed to soak into the gun port patterns; it may be necessary to add more water to the tissue. When the moisture was seen on the inner sides of the gun port patterns the tissues were removed, but the clamps were again replaced. This author used a hair drier on low heat to dry the gun ports patterns so the moisture did not weaken the wood glue used on the gun port patterns. When completed, the gap between the gun port patterns and the bulkhead tabs should be minimal Figure K51.

Figure K51 - Gap gun port pattern and bulkhead tabs are minimal
Figure K51 - Gap gun port pattern and bulkhead tabs are minimal.

Authors observations: - This part of the build is an important step in the process of this model, and unless one has had previous experience there are many things to go wrong. Whilst the author is 90% happy with the end result, there is room for improvements with the techniques used. It is hoped these comments will be useful, but as always they are only from this author.

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The GPPBR was very effective however, a disadvantage is that the gun port pattern bow butt could not be seen; this resulted in a 1 mm gap on the port side and 0.75 mm gap on the starboard side at the bottom of the butt Figure K52 and K53; the top of the butt is touching, which was considered important.

Figure K52 - Gun port pattern on starboard side
Figure K52 - Gun port pattern on starboard side.


Figure K53 - Gun port pattern on the port side
Figure K53 - Gun port pattern on the port side.

The gun port pattern butt at the bow is tapering on both sides, and would indicate that more chamfering was required on the bulkhead edges. Whilst it was considered that sufficient had been done, in retrospect it could have been more severe to the edges of bulkhead's 3 and 4.

The gun port patterns should have both been level with the top of all the bulkheads, and whilst they were prior to fixing, when actually glued the starboard side was 0.5 mm proud on bulkhead tabs 5, 6, and 7 Figure K54. Again in retrospect, 3 or 4 locating pins would have been temporarily fitted either side, to ensure that when the gun port pattern's were being glued in place there would not be the worry of having to ensure that the positioning was correct.

Figure K54 - Gun port pattern is 0.5 mm proud on bulkheads 5, 6 and 7.
Figure K54 - Gun port pattern is 0.5 mm proud on bulkheads 5, 6 and 7.

Whilst this is very annoying, it is believed this inaccuracy can be disguised during the build. The main point would be to ensure that the cannon barrels are positioned so there is the same vertical gap between the barrel and the top of the gun port.

Lloyd Matthews – October 2013 ©

Need a PDF Here it is: Gun Port Patterns (Part 1 of 2)

Thank you Lloyd a great section on the Gun Port Patterns, I will be using these techniques on my next build.

GUN PORT PATTERN

Gun Port Patterns (Part 2 of 2)

Note: - These guidance notes will incorporate the changes that have been made as a result of incorporating the Captain's Cabin into the model; they will be written in green text, so the modellers who are not constructing the Captain's Cabin can skip the section.

 

The position of the Quarter Badge (Castings) will need to be determined on the aft gun port patterns, as the window panes in the castings will be removed. Sheet 4 of the plans will be required Figure L1. To accurately position the castings, a sheet of carbon copying paper is essential for this process.

A photocopy is made of the aft gun port pattern from Sheet 4, which shows the position of the starboard quarter casting on the gun port pattern. Using either a light box, or simply a window with sunlight behind, hold the gun port pattern onto it and then position the gun port openings on the copied plan Figure L1. Holding the two together, remove and slip a piece of carbon paper between the ply and the copy of the plan. Draw very firmly the outline of the 10 window panes onto the plan, which will then copy onto the gun port pattern Figure L2.

Figure L1 - Copy from the Sheet 4 plans
Figure L1 - Copy from the Sheet 4 plans

Figure L2 - Windows of quarter casting copied onto the gun pattern
Figure L2 - Windows of quarter casting copied onto the gun pattern


For the port gun port pattern, the plan is placed onto the face of the carbon paper, and the windows are traced out, so the outline will appear on the reverse side of the copy. The same copying process is repeated for the port gun port pattern.

Note: - The image of the plan was reversed(horizontal flip) on the computer however, in this authors program it was not an exact copy.
The area of ply/planking where the rear windows are positioned, are painted with a matt varnish or a sealer on both sides; this is to ensure that the surface of the ply/planks will not splinter when creating the openings for the window panes.
The inner side walls (inner hull) are also painted with a matt varnish or a sealer to ensure that when the gun port openings are cut out the wood will also not splinter.

The rear gun port patterns were positioned on the hull to understand exactly how they were to be shaped. This author found bending them around a 1 inch cardboard tube was very effective. For a 'scratch modeller' anything may prove useful; a cardboard tube was seen lying around the vegetable department of a supermarket, and originally had plastic bags wound on it; it is very sturdy. The gun port pattern is first soaked in warm water for several hours, and then sticky taped is used to hold the gun port pattern in the desired position whilst it is drying Figure L3. Lollipop sticks were used as an anchor. There is no right or wrong way, and it is best to experiment before starting.

Figure L3 - Gun port pattern sticky taped around a cardboard tube
Figure L3 - Gun port pattern sticky taped around a cardboard tube

The mistake that was made when fixing the fwd gun port patterns was to be avoided, so temporary 'stops' are glued to the top of bulkhead no. 12 Figure L4.

Figure L4 - Temporary 'stops' glued onto bulkhead no. 12
Figure L4 - Temporary 'stops' glued onto bulkhead no. 12

To ensure that the bottom edges of the gun port pattern were evenly aligned, guides were glued either side Figure L5.

Figure L5 - Guides glued to ensure gun port patterns stayed aligned
Figure L5 - Guides glued to ensure gun port patterns stayed aligned

The cofferdams which will be used to feed the fibre optic cables to the Captain's Cabin are checked to ensure the 1 mm fibre can be threaded through Figure L6. Do take time to check that they easily go through Figure L7.

Figure L6 - Cofferdam either side of the Captain's Cabin for the fibre optic cables
Figure L6 - Cofferdam either side of the Captain's Cabin for the fibre optic cables


Figure L7 - Fibre optic cable threaded through cofferdam
Figure L7 - Fibre optic cable threaded through cofferdam

(photo taken after gun port pattern was fixed)

At this stage the fitting of the poop deck, Pt. No 29, needs to be marked around the edge, but do not remove any excess ply; draw a centre line on the ply Figure L8. Note: -this was also done for the fore deck Pt. No 30 Figure L9. These were drawn, so precautionary checks could be made when removing ply from the edge of the decks, ensuring they will always be central.

Figure L8 - Centre lines drawn on poop deck, Pt. No 29
Figure L8 - Centre lines drawn on poop deck, Pt. No 29

Figure L9 - Centre lines drawn on fore deck, Pt. No 30
Figure L9 - Centre lines drawn on fore deck, Pt. No 30

When the desired shape has been achieved for the gun port patterns, they are fitted and clamped into place. Ensure that where the fwd and aft patterns meet that there is a clamp joining them both, so ensuring a smooth continuation Figure L10.

Ensure no clamps are placed on the cofferdams, but kept on the bulkheads otherwise the gun port patterns will bend unnaturally.

Figure L10 - Clamps holding the gun port patterns in position
Figure L10 - Clamps holding the gun port patterns in position

Leave the glue to set before removing the clamps; it is important that plenty of time is taken to check and recheck everything before gluing. Making any mistakes will be very difficult to rectify. The finished results are shown in Figures L11, L12 and L13, and the lines of the vessel are beginning to take shape.

Figure L11 - Gun port patterns in place
Figure L11 - Gun port patterns in place

Figure L13 - Gun port patterns in place
Figure L12 - Gun port patterns in place


Figure L12 - Gun port patterns in position
Figure L13 - Gun port patterns in position

The gun ports will need to be opened up; a drill was used to create a series of holes Figure L14, so the balance of the wood can be removed with needle files. This will need to be done on both the port and starboard sides Figure L15.

Figure L14 - Holes are drilled into the wood filling the gun ports
Figure L14 - Holes are drilled into the wood filling the gun ports


Figure L15 - Wood removed from gun port holes
Figure L15 - Wood removed from gun port holes

The tabs are removed from bulkhead nos. 5, 6 and 7; this author used a rotary cutter Figure L16, and do ensure that the deck that had already been planked is well protected to prevent any accidental damage. The benefits of having previously pre-cut these tabs, can now be seen. When cut Figure L17, they are then made flush with the deck using a chisel craft knife Figure L18.

Figure L16 - Using a rotary cutter to remove bulkhead tabs
Figure L16 - Using a rotary cutter to remove bulkhead tabs


Figure L17 - Bulkhead tabs removed; note the protection of the existing deck planking
Figure L17 - Bulkhead tabs removed; note the protection of the existing deck planking


Figure L18 - Chisel craft knife used to make bulkhead tabs flush with deck
Figure L18 - Chisel craft knife used to make bulkhead tabs flush with deck

The main gun deck is now ready to have its planking finished. The one piece of plank that had been kept prior to fitting the fwd gun port patterns is now fitted Figure L19. The plank strips that had been kept for finishing those specific sections of planking were used, although this author noted there was already a difference in the colour of the wood. This was only noticed when the planking had been completed, but it is only noticeable when looked at from a specific direction. The gun deck is now complete Figure L20. It has been decided to wait as long as possible before varnishing the gun deck, in the hope that the new planks will weather in a similar way.

Figure L19 - Length of plank that had been cut prior to fitting the gun port pattern
Figure L19 - Length of plank that had been cut prior to fitting the gun port pattern


Figure L20 - Completed gun deck
Figure L20 - Completed gun deck

At this point it was decided to look at Part Nos. 275 and 276 Quarter Badge (Castings) left and right Figures L21 and L22. The window panes are painted black in the kit, but will need to be modified for use in the Captain's Cabin. Rather that the panes being painted, clear window panes are going to be fitted, so the inside of the cabin can be viewed.

It was anticipated that this could be a problem, and Westbourne Model Centre, (where the kit was purchased) http://www.westbourne-model.co.uk provided a spare set of castings for experimentation -  a 'thank you' to Martin for this gesture.

Figure L21 - Quarter Badge casting (left)
Figure L21 - Quarter Badge casting (left)


Figure L22 - Quarter Badge casting (right
Figure L22 - Quarter Badge casting (right

The panes of each casting are to be removed, leaving the frames only; whilst this is quite a formidable job, it is achievable with time and patience. The main tools required are a hobby drill, 0.8 and 1.2 mm Dremel drills, (Part No. 628) and a small set of diamond needle files Figure L23. Other drills were experimented with, but Dremel were the most effective not just for drilling, but at removing the metal panes, as will be explained.

Figure L23 - Small set of diamond coated needle files
Figure L23 - Small set of diamond coated needle files

The smaller window panes have 0.8 mm holes drilled in them, and then the larger panes have 1.2 mm holes drilled. The object is to remove as much metal as possible by drilling holes Figure L24.

Figure L24 - Holes are drilled in the metal window frames
Figure L24 - Holes are drilled in the metal window frames

Various methods were tried to remove the remaining metal, but the best result was obtained using the side of the drill shank(0.8 mm); gentle pressure was exerted in a sideways direction and the drill was moved up and down Figure L25. When the bulk of the metal had been removed, different size needle files were used to remove the remaining material adjacent to the frames Figure L26.

Figure L25 - Side of 0.8 mm drilled shank used to remove metal
Figure L25 - Side of 0.8 mm drilled shank used to remove metal
Figure L26


Figure L26 - Completed Quarter Badge castings with panes removed
Figure L26 - Completed Quarter Badge castings with panes removed

A similar method was employed to create the apertures in the rear gun port patterns and cabin wall. First holes were chain drilled Figure L27; second as much material was removed as possible Figure L28; thirdly needle files were used to create the exact size openings Figure L29. The openings are checked against the casting Figure L30.

Figure L27 - Holes are chained drill into the wood
Figure L27 - Holes are chained drill into the wood


Figure L28 - Excess wood is removed
Figure L28 - Excess wood is removed


Figure L29 - Needle files used to create exact sized openings
Figure L29 - Needle files used to create exact sized openings


Figure L30 - Openings are checked against casting
Figure L30 - Openings are checked against casting

The inner hull planking can be seen within the Captain's Cabin and beneath the poop/main deck; to ensure continuity the forecastles inner hull is also planked. This is a small detail, but failure to do so will be noticeable just from viewing the inside thickness of all the gun port openings.

Care was taken to ensure that the inner hull longitudinal plank joints would all be inline; this is only a small detail however, an accumulation of small details will enhance the completed model! Planking commenced in the forecastle Figure L31.

Figure L31 - Inner hull planking is inline along the length of the inner hull (after gluing)
Figure L31 - Inner hull planking is inline along the length of the inner hull (after gluing)

Clamps are used to glue the planks in place between bulkheads no. 3 and 4 Figure L32, ensuring that they are in full contact with the gun port pattern.

Figure L32 - Clamps hold planks in place between bulkheads no. 3 and 4
Figure L32 - Clamps hold planks in place between bulkheads no. 3 and 4

The planks between bulkheads nos. 1 / 2 and 2 / 3 will require pre-bending before fitting. First cut the plank to the required length, then soak in warm water for an hour. Using a 71/2 inch saucepan, the plank is clamped on the edge of the rim and allowed to dry Figure L33 and L34; a hair dryer can be used to quicken the process.

Figure L33 - Plank bent on rim of saucepan
Figure L33 - Plank bent on rim of saucepan


Figure L34 - Plank shaped using a saucepan
Figure L34 - Plank shaped using a saucepan

When laying the first plank, they may have to be shaped; also the top plank will need to be shaped to fit under the fore deck Figure L35.

Figure L35 - Bottom and top planks may have to be shaped
Figure L35 - Bottom and top planks may have to be shaped

The inside of bulkhead no. 1 is planked; the planks will required fitting around the bowsprit hole Figure L36.

Figure L36 - Inside of bulkhead no.1 planked
Figure L36 - Inside of bulkhead no.1 planked

The gun ports are drilled and finished with needle files Figure L37.

Figure L37 - Gun ports are drilled and finished with needle files
Figure L37 - Gun ports are drilled and finished with needle files

For the second planking of the hull, individually planks will be used rather than just long strips. This is a question of choice however, it is felt that it may add a little realism to the model. The bulwarks on the main deck will also be planked, and for this, the pattern on the main deck will be followed.

For the port side the outline of the forward gun port pattern from Plans Sheet No. 3 is used Figure L38. For the starboard side the outline of the gun port pattern is traced onto its reverse side Figure L39.

Figure L38 - Port side bulwark pattern
Figure L38 - Port side bulwark pattern


Figure L39 - Starboard side bulwark pattern
Figure L39 - Starboard side bulwark pattern

Figures L40 and L41 illustrate the port side bulwark pattern in relation to the model. Figures L42 and L43 illustrate the starboard side bulwark pattern.

Figure L40 - Port side bulwark pattern
Figure L40 - Port side bulwark pattern


Figure L41 - Continuation of deck pattern onto port bulwark
Figure L41 - Continuation of deck pattern onto port bulwark


Figure L42 - Starboard side bulwark pattern
Figure L42 - Starboard side bulwark pattern


Figure L43 - Continuation of deck pattern onto starboard bulwark
Figure L43 - Continuation of deck pattern onto starboard bulwark

The port and starboard bulwarks are planked however, the area's for Pt. No 38 deck beam, and the fore deck are not planked Figure L44. The deck pattern is continued on the inside of the bulwarks Figure 45.

Figure L44 - Areas on both the port and starboard bulwarks are not planked
Figure L44 - Areas on both the port and starboard bulwarks are not planked


Figure L45 - Deck pattern continued onto both the port and starboard bulwarks
Figure L45 - Deck pattern continued onto both the port and starboard bulwarks


The inside of the bulwarks were sealed to prevent the wood from splintering, and then the gun ports were opened out Figure L46, as previously described; excess wood was removed from the top plank of the bulwarks.

Figure L46 - Gun ports created either side of the main deck
Figure L46 - Gun ports created either side of the main deck


The beams for both the poop and fore deck Figure L47 and L48 are temporarily fitted into place; particular attention is made to the beam across bulkhead no. 8. The top should be sanded to fit the slope of the poop deck; care is taken to ensure it is at the correct height for the thickness of the ply deck and the thickness the planks, which when laid will be flush to the top edge of the port and starboard gun port patterns Figure L49 and L50. Material is removed from the edges of the decks until they fit. The poop deck needs to be slightly bowed along its length and then 'sprung' into position Figure L51, so be sure not to remove too much material. The fore deck is easier to fit into place Figure L52.

Figure L47 - Beams temporarily fitted in place for the poop deck
Figure L47 - Beams temporarily fitted in place for the poop deck


Figure L48 - Beams temporarily fitted in place for the fore deck
Figure L48 - Beams temporarily fitted in place for the fore deck


Figure L49 - Deck beam sanded to fit slope of poop deck
Figure L49 - Deck beam sanded to fit slope of poop deck


Figure L50 - Sufficient depth for ply deck and plank
Figure L50 - Sufficient depth for ply deck and plank


Figure L51 - Poop deck is 'sprung' into position
Figure L51 - Poop deck is 'sprung' into position


Figure L52 - Fore deck loosely placed into position
Figure L52 - Fore deck loosely placed into position

The poop and fore decks will be fitted at a later date; the bulwark planking will then be completed.

Note: - This author has decided not to fit the beam between bulkhead no. 8 until the interior of the Captain's Cabin has been finished, so allowing unrestricted access to the aft end of the model.

Part 2 PDF
Lloyd Matthews – Nov 2013 ©

Thanks Lloyd. A fantastic in depth look at the Gun Port Patterns.

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