HMS FLY Captains Cabin

Coach Cabin Chair (Scale 1:64)

 

It is thought that perhaps the chairs in the Coach Cabin would be of a different style to those in the Great Cabin, and a maritime folding chair was researched at http://michaelpashbyantiques.com/shop/seating/18th-century-mahogany-naval-campaign-chair/ as shown in Figure AM1 . Whilst this is a foldable chair it will be used as an example from which model chairs will be made for the Coach Cabin; it is circa 1770.

Coach Cabin Chair
Fig AM1 - Coach Cabin Chair

Dimensions    = height  x  width  x  depth
Inches             = 33.5ins x 19ins x 16ins
Millimetres     = 850.9mm x 482.6mm x 406.4mm
1:64 scale      = 13.29mm x 7.54mm x 6.35mm

The scale chair is made from film that was given to this author and originated from “Folex Film Systems”. Modellers interested in using this film should contact www.folex.com telephone: 0121 733 3833; they are a firm who only supplies films for printing! The clear sheet used is 4 thousandth of inch [0.1016mm]. Alternatively, acetate film could be purchased from a hobby store or the window of some packaging could be experimented with; its colour is not important, and whilst only four chairs are required, more are made and the best four are chosen.

The outline of six chairs are given in Figure AM2, (note crease lines in Figure AM4), and the five shapes at the bottom of the figure will be used for making a template for folding the chair around, and also fixing the chairs to the deck which will be explained further on. Note: - print Figure AM2 on standard 80 g/m copier paper at 100% / Scale 1:1 and at best quality.

Coach Cabin Chairs (Print at 100% / Scale 1:1 at best quality
Fig AM2 - Coach Cabin Chairs (Print at 100% / Scale (below)1:1 at best quality)

Please use the PDF link here to print chairs PDF Chairs

3M Craft Mount Permanent Spray Adhesive is used to fix Figure AM2 onto the film, Figure AM3.
It is probably advisable to make the chair in a larger size; use Figure AM4 just to understand how the chair is going to fold and what it should look like.

This author did this and the results are shown in Figure AM3; the larger chair is 87mm in height, and the small 1:64 scale chair is 13.2mm in height. This author found that this was actually a very useful exercise.

AM3 – Coach Cabin chairs 87mm and 13.2mm in height
Fig AM3 – Coach Cabin chairs 87mm and 13.2mm in height

 

AM4 – Large Coach Cabin Chair (print scale 1:1)
Fig AM4 – Large Coach Cabin Chair (print scale 1:1)

Please use the PDF link here to the template a 1.1 scale PDF Large Chair

This author used X-ACTO Z-11 blade with a 300mm X 220mm (12” X 9”) cutting mat. It was found that the best results were achieved by using one blade for two chairs, as it is the very sharp point of the blade which is being used. The used blades would still be sharp enough for other jobs. Figure AM5 illustrates the sequence for cutting the sections out of the box sections of the Coach Cabin Chair.

AM5 – Sequence for cutting out of the sections in the Coach Cabin Chair
Fig AM5 – Sequence for cutting out of the sections in the Coach Cabin Chair

Prior to cutting the chair, score the crease lines with a blunt craft knife as the ease of folding the chair is critical. Care must be taken to ensure that the film is not inadvertently cut. It is probably better to practise on a scrap piece of film, but this will also be discussed further on.

This author cut the lower sections of the chair first as shown in Figure AM6; the reason is that if a mistake were made and one of the supports between the leg was cut, it was better that it should occur at the beginning of the cutting process rather than at the end, when it would be very annoying! The chair completely cut out is shown in Figure AM7.

AM6 – The lower sections of the chair are cut out first
Fig AM6 – The lower sections of the chair are cut out first

AM7 – Cut out chair
Fig AM7 – Cut out chair

To ensure that the creases fold easily a ‘swivel craft knife’ is used to make small ‘dash’ cut marks in the crease with the point of the blade; this craft knife was adapted as shown in Figure AM8, to ensure that it does not ‘swivel’.

AM8 – Adapted ‘swivel craft knife’; this will ensure that the blade will not swivel
Fig AM8 – Adapted ‘swivel craft knife’; this will ensure that the blade will not swivel

The ‘dash’ cuts are shown on the reverse side of the cut-out coach chair in Figure AM9; Note, they do look rather messy but in fact the chairs will turn out looking OK, as will be shown further on.

AM9 – Reverse side of the Coach Cabin chairs showing the ‘dash’ cuts on the crease lines
Fig AM9 – Reverse side of the Coach Cabin chairs showing the ‘dash’ cuts on the crease lines

Ensuring that the chairs will fold easily along the crease lines is a balance between not cutting enough, and cutting the film too much, and practice is recommended on a scrap piece of film to ensure the crease will bend easily, yet not break.

This author made the template by gluing three lollipop sticks together, but in reality, any suitable square length of wood can be used. The template shown in Figure AM2 is glued to the end of the square length as shown in Figure AM10. This author made it a little smaller then wound clear sticky tape around the end to make it bigger. The clear sticky tape prevents the superglue which is used for joining the ends of the folded chair as illustrated in Figure AM11.

AM10 – Template is made for folding the Coach Cabin chair around
Fig AM10 – Template is made for folding the Coach Cabin chair around

AM11 – The Coach Cabin chair is superglued at its folded ends whilst positioned around the template
Fig AM11 – The Coach Cabin chair is superglued at its folded ends whilst positioned around the template

Holding the folded chairs around the template is rather tricky, but if a system is followed then it is easily achievable. This author attempted this process many times prior to finding the best way, however, it does not mean that this would be the only method. A template has been made that just fits around the front, back and side of the chair Figure AM12; there must be sufficient room for the chair to fit between the two templates. This can be achieved by wrapping more/less clear sticky tape around the end of the long template, or adjusting the width of the flat template.

AM12 – The long and the flat templates
Fig AM12 – The long and the flat templates

Vaseline is rubbed into the flat template in the area where the chair will be superglued. This will prevent any adhesive from adhering to the flat template should some get onto it. The clear sticky tape wound around the top of the long template will prevent the chair sticking to it.

The chair is folded around the long template and is held in place by the flat length of wood “A” shown in Figure AM13. The flat template is then fixed into place which will hold three sides of the chair. The 3mm brass square section is then placed against the fourth side of the chair and held onto the long template by wrapping clear sticky tape around the brass square section and long template. The bottom of the ends of the chair are exactly lined up as illustrated in Figure AM11 and Figure AM14.

AM13 – The chair is folded around the long template and held in position
Fig AM13 – The chair is folded around the long template and held in position

AM14 – The bottom of the chair ends are exactly aligned
Fig AM14 – The bottom of the chair ends are exactly aligned

The flat template and supports are removed, then the chair is carefully slid off the template; it may need to be eased off with the point of a sharp craft knife. Figure AM15 illustrates the chair having been removed from the templates.

AM15 – Chair slid from the long template
Fig AM15 – Chair slid from the long template

To ensure that the chair frame is square when the seat is glued down, a further template is made as shown in Figure AM16.

AM16 – Template for holding the Coach Cabin chair square
Fig AM16 – Template for holding the Coach Cabin chair square

The chair is placed in the square template to ensure it is square prior to fixing the seat Figure AM17.

AM17 – Chair is placed in the square template
Fig AM17 – Chair is placed in the square template

The seat is held down whilst the front edge is superglued with a pin, Figure AM18.

AM18 – Front edge of the chair has superglue ran along its edge with a pin
Fig AM18 – Front edge of the chair has superglue ran along its edge with a pin

The side edge of the chair has superglue ran along its edge with a pin, Figure AM19

AM19 – The side of the chair has superglue ran along its edge with a pin
Fig AM19 – The side of the chair has superglue ran along its edge with a pin

The completed chair is shown in Figure AM20.

AM20 – The chair has had superglue ran along its edges
Fig AM20 – The chair has had superglue ran along its edges

Four completed Coach Cabin chairs are shown in Figure AM21; the pin laying across their seats are to give an idea of their scale.

AM21 ¬– Completed Coach Cabin chairs
Fig AM21 ­– Completed Coach Cabin chairs

The chairs can be made to look more realistic by bending the back of the chair slightly, and the difference can be seen in Figure AM21.

AM22 – The back of the chair is bent back slightly
Fig AM22 – The back of the chair is bent back slightly

There is only a small area below the feet of the chair to fix them to the deck, so like with the cannon carriages they are ‘pinned’ to the deck in a similar manor as the cannon carriages which can be seen at http://hmsfly.com/cannonAndChannels.html.

As with the gun carriages, 0.45mm Polyamide beading thread is used. To ensure good adhesion to the inside area of the chair legs, they are fitted prior to painting the chairs.

Approximately 35mm of beading thread is cut for each chair leg. Using clear sticky tape to hold the thread down, the thread is fixed so the thread is bent straight to a flat piece of scrap wood with approximately 9mm of thread free of clear sticky tape. The chair leg is lifted under the free piece of thread and positioned into the corner of the chair leg. A scrap craft knife is positioned under the back rest so the thread is horizontal to the chair leg. Using a pin, superglue is applied to the length of the thread/inside of chair leg, and capillary action will pull the glue along the thread and chair leg; this is illustrated in Figure AM23.

This process is repeated for the four legs of the chairs, and the completed Coach Cabin chairs are seen in Figure AM24. It can be seen that the beading thread have a mind of their own once the clear sticky tape has been removed.

AM23 – Beading thread is held squarely on the inside leg and superglue is applied
Fig AM23 – Beading thread is held squarely on the inside leg and superglue is applied

AM24 – Coach Cabin chairs with Polyamide beading thread fitted
Fig AM24 – Coach Cabin chairs with Polyamide beading thread fitted

The following is a simple illustration of how the chairs will finally be fitted into the Coach Cabin. The four templates in Figure AM2 will be individually fixed with clear sticky tape onto the deck of the model. Using the 0.7mm drill used for drilling the gun carriage holes http://hmsfly.com/cannonAndChannels.html – Figure Z9, holes are drilled into the four corners of the template, Figure AM25.

Figure AM26 illustrates how the chairs will then be fitted to the Coach Cabin deck.

AM25 – Holes being drilled to fix the chairs to the deck
Fig AM25 – Holes being drilled to fix the chairs to the deck

AM26 – Chairs fixed to a flat piece of wood representing the deck
Fig AM26 – Chairs fixed to a flat piece of wood representing the deck

The chairs are hand painted; firstly, they are primed with ‘DULUX – Difficult surface Primer’. They are then painted with two coats of Humbrol Matt 70. This author used a Humbrol 00 Coloro paint brush; when painting, the brush was regularly kept clean to avoid a build-up of dried paint on the bristles, however, every modeller will have developed their own painting techniques.

The four completed Coach Cabin chairs are shown in Figure AM27

AM27 – Completed Coach Cabin chairs
Fig AM27 – Completed Coach Cabin chairs

Lloyd Matthews - August 2018 ©

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