HMS Fly Coach Cabin Table

Coach Cabin Table (Scale 1:64)

The Coach Cabin Table has been based on one viewed and measured at the National Maritime Museum Greenwich which can be seen here, Figure AN1.

These measurements will be taken into consideration when creating the scale plan for the table, Figure AN5.

Figure AN1 - The Coach Cabin table has been based on the above (© National Maritime Museum)
Figure AN1 - The Coach Cabin table has been based on the above (© National Maritime Museum)

Dimensions = length x width x height
Inches (approx.) = 36ins x 19ins x 29ins (height)
Millimetres = 920mm x 476mm x 735mm (height)
1:64 scale = 14.38mm x 7.44mm x 11.48mm (height)
This table is used as a guide only, so a modellers discretion is being used and the dimensions are 17mm x 9mm x 11.5mm (height)

Note: - There is no visual continuity between the photographs however, they are illustrating the techniques used, and for this there is continuity.

As a suggestion, copy Figure AN2 into a Word document then enlarge as far as possible onto an A4 landscaped document Figure AN3, then print on A4 copier paper. This printed design is glued to a piece of card, i.e. from a cereal box, and assembled, Figure AN4.

Figure AN2 – Copy into a Word document
Figure AN2 – Copy into a Word document

Figure AN3 – Plan enlarged into a Word document
Figure AN3 – Plan enlarged into a Word document

Figure AN4 – Assembled tables for comparison
Figure AN4 – Assembled tables for comparison

The plans for the 1:64 scale Coach Table are shown in Figure AN5 and Figure AN6, (print 1:1 scale). To understand the subtleties of the cutting and creasing please refer to Figure AN3.

Figure AN5 – Leg section of Coach Table (print 1:1 scale)
Figure AN5 – Leg section of Coach Table (print 1:1 scale)

Figure AN6 – Top of Coach Table (print 1:1 scale)
Figure AN6 – Top of Coach Table (print 1:1 scale)

Print Figure AN5 and Figure AN6 (scale 1:1) onto 80gsm plain copier paper. Authors printer - Epson ET-4550, print setting: - best quality. Using 3M Craft Mount Permanent Adhesive, fixed to an acetate film.

Note: - For Figures AN5, AN6 and AN16 print “Coach Cabin Table Figures Scale 1:1.pdf

Figure AN5 can be made using 100micron / 4 thousandth of inch / 0.1016mm acetate film, however this can be a little ‘fiddly’, so this author would recommend it is made from 180micron / 7 thousandth of inch / 0.18mm film. This can be purchased via Amazon Click Here.

Figure AN6 is made from 100micron / 4 thousandth of inch / 0.1016mm acetate film which originates from “Folex Film Systems”; the product name is X-10.0 and the code is 39100.100.44000. Modellers interested in using this film should contact folex.com telephone: 0121 733 3833; they are a firm who only supplies films for printing! You may need to find another company depending where you are in the world.

Alternatively, acetate film could be purchased from a hobby store, or the window of some packaging could be experimented with.

Once the printed designs have been fixed to the acetate film, coat the surface of Figure AN5 with Satin Matt Varnish to protect the surface as there is quite a lot of handling when assembling the Coach Table. It was found it also keeps the metal ruler from slipping. On the reverse side, sand with P120 Abrasive Paper as this will provide a good surface for the super glue (10 seconds cure) to adhere, which will be used later, Figure AN7.

Figure AN7 - Surface of reverse side of acetate film is made rough with abrasive paper
Figure AN7 - Surface of reverse side of acetate film is made rough with abrasive paper

Study Figure AN3 carefully and understand where both the creases and cuts will occur and then follow the sequence of creasing and cutting as shown in Figure AN8.

Figure AN8 – Follow the sequence for creasing and cutting
Figure AN8 – Follow the sequence for creasing and cutting

Suggested sequence for creasing and cutting: -

1 – Cut along the continuous dotted line only.

2 – Cut a crease along the width of the diagram, which means the crease will run along both numbers 2 & 8; 8 will later be cut. (Guidance: - It is advisable to practice on a scrap piece of film to judge what pressure is required to produce an effective crease. This author used a craft knife blade, which had been used, so there is less likelihood of cutting through the complete film. Using the 180micron film is a lot easier to crease than the 100micron film, although it is achievable.)

3 – Cut a crease between the legs, which means the crease will run along both numbers 3 & 8, and follow the guidance in step 2.

4 – Cut the small corner right angles; this author found it was quicker to cut all the horizontal first, and vertical second.

5 - Cut the angled lines.

6 – Cut the horizontal lines.

7 – Cut the inside of the legs.

8 – Cut the horizontal and vertical lines as indicated.

9 – Cut the side of the end legs.

10 – Cut the two horizontal top lines.

Figure AN9 illustrates the importance of cutting along the dotted line first!

Figure AN9 – Reason why the dotted line should be cut first!
Figure AN9 – Reason why the dotted line should be cut first!

Once the design has been cut it will need to be carefully removed from the acetate film. This author ‘picked’ the design out, and regardless of how it is done patience will be required to remove the excess film from around the design. It is dependent upon how good the cuts are made which will determine how well the excess film can be removed.

Figure AN10 shows the film is being removed with some difficulty, yet Figure AN11 illustrates how the film can be removed quite easily. All depends on how well the cuts are made, and this author would recommend a new X-ACTO Z series 11 blade for the cuts. Remember the creases only need a well-used craft blade so the acetate film is not cut through.

Figure AN10 – Printed design removed from acetate film with difficulty
Figure AN10 – Printed design removed from acetate film with difficulty

Figure AN11 – Printed design removed quite easily from the acetate film
Figure AN11 – Printed design removed quite easily from the acetate film

Once the design has been removed the creases are first folded in on themselves to ensure the assembly is folded easily. The miniature pliers shown in Figure AN12 are used to help bend the film and when completed the table legs section should look like Figure AN13.

Figure AN12 – Miniature pliers used for bending the acetate film
Figure AN12 – Miniature pliers used for bending the acetate film

Figure AN13 – Leg section of table creases folded
Figure AN13 – Leg section of table creases folded

When folding the leg section, it is essential the creases are all square and for this a simple tool was made.

A brass right angled section of 8mm is inserted into a block of wood, then a longitudinal length is fixed in line with it. Clear sticky tape is fixed to the wood, and inside of the vertical brass right angle, to prevent the superglue which will be used on the table legs from adhering to the wood and metal; this is all illustrated in Figure AN14.

Figure AN14 – Tool for assembling and gluing table leg’s
Figure AN14 – Tool for assembling and gluing table leg’s

Approximate dimensions of the brass angle bar for guidance: -

Vertical above wood = 17mm. Longitudinal square bar clear sticky taped to the wood = 29mm. Smaller lose square sections = 26mm and 18mm.

1.6mm holes were chain drilled in the wood, into which the square section was vertically glued.

Figure AN15 illustrates the leg section having been creased and held in position ready for gluing.

Figure AN15 – Holding table legs into position
Figure AN15 – Holding table legs into position

Figure AN16 is the insert for gluing the legs section together. It is printed (1:1 scale) and using 3M Craft Mount Permanent Adhesive, is fixed to 180 acetate film and cut out.

Note: - For Figures AN5, AN6 and AN16 print “Coach Cabin Table Figures Scale 1:1.pdf

Figure AN16 – Insert for gluing legs
Figure AN16 – Insert for gluing legs

After having been glued to the acetate film, a square from Figure AN16 is cut and using superglue (10 seconds cure) is fitted as illustrated in Figure AN17. Apply superglue on a pin to the inside corner of the leg.

Figure AN17 – Square section from Figure AN16 is fitted
Figure AN17 – Square section from Figure AN16 is fitted

Note: Figure AN18 shows how the square piece from Figure AN16 can be applied with a little two-sided sticky tape wrapped around a toothpick.

Figure AN18 – Section applied with toothpick and two-sided sticky tape
Figure AN18 – Section applied with toothpick and two-sided sticky tape

A further piece of Figure AN16 is super glued into position as shown in Figure AN19.

Figure AN19 – Further piece from Figure AN16 secures table legs
Figure AN19 – Further piece from Figure AN16 secures table legs

Leg assembly is turned and the remaining piece of Figure AN16 is superglued into position as shown in Figure AN20.

Figure AN20 – Final piece of Figure AN16 fitted
Figure AN20 – Final piece of Figure AN16 fitted

The assembled legs assembly can be seen in Figure AN21.

Figure AN21 – Completed legs assembly
Figure AN21 – Completed legs assembly

White 80gsm paper is fixed to the reverse side of Figure AN6 with 3M Spray Mount Adhesive, thus making the table top 14 thousandth of an inch, compared to the scale thickness of 10.4 thousandth of an inch. The legs assembly are positioned onto the table top prior to supergluing, hence eliminating the chance of incorrectly applying the legs!

Three 1.6mm holes are drilled into the legs assembly as illustrated in Figure AN22.

Figure AN22 – Drill stand used to drill 3 x 1.2mm holes in the legs assembly
Figure AN22 – Drill stand used to drill 3 x 1.2mm holes in the legs assembly

Once drilled, the top is sanded on P800 Abrasive Paper to ensure burs are removed, and superglue is applied with a pin around the inside edge as indicated in Figure AN23. The reason this is done, is as superglue is dropped into the three holes, this prevents any excess from running through the cuts in the creases of the legs assembly.

Figure AN23 - Legs assembly is sanded to remove any burs, and superglue is applied to the inside edge as indicated
Figure AN23 - Legs assembly is sanded to remove any burs, and superglue is applied to the inside edge as indicated

The legs assembly is fitted exactly on top of the table top as indicated in Figure AN24.

Figure AN24 – Legs assembly goes on table top
Figure AN24 – Legs assembly goes on table top

Once the legs assembly is positioned, press it very firmly in place with one hand, whilst the other applies several drops of superglue into the three holes, as shown in Figure AN25; just put sufficient to initially fill each hole. Keep pushing the legs assembly down for several minutes whilst the superglue starts to bond, then leave for at least an hour.

Note: - A very small tube of Loctite Superglue was used as the drops were smaller and more controllable to apply, Figure AN26.

Figure AN25 – Superglue dropped into holes
Figure AN25 – Superglue dropped into holes

Figure AN26 – With this tube of superglue it’s easy to control the drops
Figure AN26 – With this tube of superglue it’s easy to control the drops

As with the gun carriages, 0.45mm Polyamide beading thread is used. To ensure good adhesion to the inside area of the table legs, they are fitted prior to painting the table.

It is advisable to straighten the Polyamide thread otherwise it can be awkward to fit. This author wrapped some thread around the glass front of a cupboard door then using a hairdryer blew hot air over the thread. This arrangement can be seen in Figure AN27.

Figure AN27 – Polyamide thread straightened over a glass cupboard door with a hairdryer
Figure AN27 – Polyamide thread straightened over a glass cupboard door with a hairdryer

Approximately 4 x 100mm lengths of Polyamide beading thread is cut for each table leg. A piece of 180micron acetate film is positioned 12mm from the end of the wood, and clear sticky taped into position. The beading thread is fixed straight to the wood with clear sticky tape, leaving approximately 12mm free from the end. The table leg is slid beneath the thread and when positioned into the corner of the leg, superglue (10 seconds cure) is applied with a pin; a capillary action will spread the superglue along the thread; leave to dry for at least 30 minutes, Figure AN28.

Figure AN28 – Fixing the Polyamide thread to the four table legs
Figure AN28 – Fixing the Polyamide thread to the four table legs

This author gave the table a coat of Flat Matt Varnish prior to giving it two coats of Humbrol Enamel 113, Figure AN29.

Figure AN29 - Completed Coach Cabin Table
Figure AN29 - Completed Coach Cabin Table

As an experiment, the Coach Cabin Table & Chair were positioned together, Figure AN30.

Figure AN30 – Coach Cabin Table & Chair together with a 32mm sewing pin
Figure AN29 - Completed Coach Cabin Table

The dimensions for the Coach Cabin Table are: -

Target: - 17mm (length) x 9mm (width) x 11.5mm (height)
Table top 0.266mm (0.01046ins)
Actual: - 17mm (length) x 9mm (width) x 11.75mm (height)
Table top 0.36mm (0.014ins)


Lloyd Matthews – January 2020 ©

Top