HMS Fly Stateroom Wash Stand (Scale 1:64)

Initially Admiral Nelson’s Wash Stand was going to be based on a replica onboard H.M.S. Victory Figure AK1, but since the photograph in the book was taken it has been removed, so the estimated dimensions originally used could not be checked.

Figure AK1 - Nelson’s Wash Stand
Figure AK1 - Nelson’s Wash Stand

[© Haynes Publishing (2012), HMS Victory 1765-1812 (First rate ship of the line) Owners’ Workshop Manual, Sparkford, Yeovil, Somerset, BA22 7JJ, page 55.]

Nelson’s original Wash Stand which he had on board HMS Victory was researched, and can be viewed here. Figure AK2. It has a plaque on it saying, “Lord Nelson’s cabin Washstand on board the Victory/ Owner J. Augustine Brown Esq.”

Figure AK2 - Nelson’s Shaving and Wash Stand
Figure AK2 - Nelson’s Shaving and Wash Stand

Image from here.

Actual dimensions = width top closed / width top open x depth x height open

Inches = 16.75 / 33.50 x 15.75 x 34.25

Millimetres = 425.45 / 850.90 x 400.05 x 869.95

1:64 scale mm = 6.65 / 13.30 x 6.25 x 13.60

Note: - Initially a model was made following the design shown in Figure AK1, and many of the photographs in these guidance notes reflect this, and will be referred to as ‘previous model’. The model finally made with the correct dimensions is based on Figure AK2, and whilst there is no continuity to the Figures shown, the techniques they are illustrating are correct.

CAUTION: - Prior to building the Wash Stand it must be emphasized this item is a challenge to construct, and considering it is hardly seen in the Stateroom it could rationally be decided to leave it. However, it combines two techniques already used; firstly, the acetate film being used to make the chairs in the Coach Cabin, and secondly fixing a printed design onto a wooden base as shown in the Sea Chest, Writing Desk and Welsh Dresser. The Wash Stand incorporates both these techniques except the printed design is applied to the acetate film, then the film to wood.

As a suggestion, copy Figure AK6 into a Word document then enlarge it as far as
possible onto an A4 landscaped document Figure AK3, then print on A4 copier paper.

Figure AK3 – Figure AK6 copied into a Word Document then enlarged
Figure AK3 – Figure AK6 copied into a Word Document then enlarged

This printed design is glued to a piece of card, i.e. from a cereal box, and cut out as shown in Figure AK4.

Figure AK4 – Enlarged Washbasin designed cut-out on card (previous model)
Figure AK4 – Enlarged Washbasin designed cut-out on card (previous model)

The Wash Stand is folded into shape Figure AK5, and clear sticky tape is used to keep it together. This is approximately 1:10 scale; the smaller Wash Stand is 1:64 scale.

Figure AK5 – 1:10 scale cereal box Wash Stand, compared to actual 1:64 scale (previous model)
Figure AK5 – 1:10 scale cereal box Wash Stand, compared to actual 1:64 scale (previous model)

As it has already been stated its construction is quite difficult, so there is no visual continuity between the photographs as many attempts were made to construct this item however, they are illustrating the techniques used, and for this there is continuity.

The printed plan for the Wash Stand is illustrated in Figure AK6, and to make it clearer to understand a larger version is shown in Figure AK7 so the subtleties for cutting and creasing lines can be observed.

Note: - For Figures AK6, AK7, AK10 and AK16 “print out, here” Great Cabin Stateroom Wash Stand Figures Scale 1-1.pdf

Figure AK6 – Printed design for Washbasin (Print scale 1:1)
Figure AK6 – Printed design for Washbasin (Print scale 1:1)

Figure AK6 – Printed design for Washbasin (Print scale 1:1)
Figure AK7 – Enlarged picture of Washbasin design

In constructing this item, a pair of self-closing tweezers as shown in Figure AK8 were essential.

Figure AK8 – Self-closing tweezers
Figure AK8 – Self-closing tweezers

Print Figure AK6 (scale 1:1) onto 80gsm plain copier paper. Authors printer - Epson ET-4550, print setting: - best quality. Using 3M Craft Mount Permanent Adhesive, it is fixed to an acetate film which this author was given, originating from “Folex Film Systems”. Modellers interested in using this film should contact www.folex.com telephone: 0121 733 3833; they are a firm who only supplies films for printing! The clear sheet used is 100 micron / 4 thousandth of inch / 0.1016mm. The product name is X-10.0 and the code is 39100.100.44000.

Alternatively, acetate film could be purchased from a hobby store or the window of some packaging could be experimented with.

Once the printed design has been fixed to the acetate film, coat the surface of the printed paper with Satin Matt Varnish to protect the printed surface as there is quite a lot of handling when assembling the Wash Stand. It was found it also keeps the metal ruler from slipping. On the reverse side, sand with P120 Abrasive Paper as this will provide a good surface for the super glue (10 seconds cure) to adhere Figure AK9, which will be used later.

Figure AK9 – Surface of reverse side of acetate film is made rough with abrasive paper
Figure AK9 – Surface of reverse side of acetate film is made rough with abrasive paper

Many attempts were made to construct the Wash Stand and when it was felt that a successful attempt was to be achieved a new X-ACTO Z series #11 blade was utilised.

First, the point of the blade is used to first make small ‘dash cuts’ as illustrated in Figure AK10; pay careful attention not to cut the edge of the printed design as indicated with the blue circles. Next the Wash Stand is slowly and deliberately cut from the acetate film; this is a process which must not be rushed and will probably take several attempts to achieve – so don’t give up!!

Figure AK10 - Illustrating ‘dash cuts’ must not be taken to the edge of the printed design
Figure AK10 - Illustrating ‘dash cuts’ must not be taken to the edge of the printed design

Figure AK6 is cut-out as shown in Figure AK11; it will be found many attempts will be required to achieve a Wash Stand which can be used, and this author went through exactly the same process!

 
Figure AK11 – Illustrating Figure AK6 cut-out, and before folding
Figure AK11 – Illustrating Figure AK6 cut-out, and before folding

Figure AK12 illustrates the dash-cuts from the reverse side of Figure AK11; note they are spaced 1 mm apart.

Figure AK12 – Reverse side of Figure AK11 illustrating 1mm dash-cuts
Figure AK12 – Reverse side of Figure AK11 illustrating 1mm dash-cuts

When the Wash Stand is cut-out, the creases are pre-folded using a tool made from a 50mm Paper Binder clip as shown in Figure AK13.

Figure AK13 - One side of crease is held firmly flat and folded 90 degrees (previous model)
Figure AK13 - One side of crease is held firmly flat and folded 90 degrees (previous model)

Alternatively, a pair of miniature flat nose pliers as shown in Figure AK14; the folded Wash Stand is seen in Figure AK15.

Figure AK14 – Minatare flat nose pliers used to aid the bending of the creases
Figure AK14 – Minatare flat nose pliers used to aid the bending of the creases

Figure AK15 – Wash Stand with creases pre-folded
Figure AK15 – Wash Stand with creases pre-folded

The wooden base for the Washbasin is made from 1.5mm thick x 10mm wide strip lime wood. It is essential the base is made as square as possible so all processes are employed to achieve this.

As with the Sea Chest, Writing Desk and Welsh Dresser patterns and a template are used, and these are shown in Figure AK16.

Figure AK16 - Patterns and Template for the Wash Stand wooden base (print scale 1:1)
Figure AK16 - Patterns and Template for the Wash Stand wooden base (print scale 1:1)

The printed patterns are stuck onto cut sections of the lime wood, ensuring the top is level with the squarest edge of the lime wood, Figure AK17.

Note: - Which ever edge is thought to be the ‘squarest’ is used. Sometimes the edge of the strip wood may not be perfectly square.

Figure AK17 - Patterns are fixed to the lime wood (previous model)
Figure AK17 - Patterns are fixed to the lime wood (previous model)

Whilst 6 patterns are printed 3 are spare; the finished patterns ready for shaping, Figure AK18.

Figure AK18 - Patterns ready for shaping (previous model)
Figure AK18 - Patterns ready for shaping (previous model)

The patterns are shaped using a chisel craft knife and needle files; to ensure they are all the exact same size a template is made and used.

This author will always have a good look around ‘Haberdashery’ departments as many useful items can be found which can be utilised for modelling. ‘Sew Group International’ produce a ‘Template Plastic Plain’ Item Number ER398, which was ideal, but any acetate plastic could be used providing it is of a suitable thickness; for example, plastic report covers.

Using 3M Craft Mount Permanent Adhesive, the template in Figure AK16 is fixed to the ‘Template Plastic’ and precisely cut out.

It can be difficult to hold the patterns whilst they are being filed to fit into the template, so they can be held in a Binder Clip as shown in Figure AK19.

Figure AK19 – Patterns are held in a Binder Clip whilst filing them (previous model)
Figure AK19 – Patterns are held in a Binder Clip whilst filing them (previous model)

The patterns must fit through the template and it was found that it was easier to check the length and the widths of the patterns separately as illustrated in Figure AK20, and then when glued together, illustrated in Figure AK21.

Figure AK20 - Pattern checked in template (previous model)
Figure AK20 - Pattern checked in template (previous model)

Ensure the square edge the lime wood is clearly marked on its edge Figure AK21, before removing the paper, as described in the ‘Writing Desk Figure AI12.’

Figure AK21 – Square edge of lime wood marked, and glued patterns fitted through template (previous model)
Figure AK21 – Square edge of lime wood marked, and glued patterns fitted through template (previous model)

Gluing the lime wood patterns together can either be achieved by ‘eye’ or using a small set square Figure AK22. This author used both methods and probably favours using the ‘eye’; the famous saying, “…..if it looks right then it is right…..” is sometimes easier!

Figure AK22 – If using a set square, ensure all square edges are set against the blade (previous model)
Figure AK22 – If using a set square, ensure all square edges are set against the blade (previous model)

The completed wooden base is shown in Figure AK23

Figure AK23 – Wooden base made from lime wood patterns (previous model)
Figure AK23 – Wooden base made from lime wood patterns (previous model)

Gluing the printed Wash Stand onto the lime wood base can be very tricky, and it is through trial and error this is achieved. It is advisable to make two Wash Stands, one is used for initially checking the size of the wooden base, which may need further adjustment, but only adjust the three surfaces as indicated in, Figure AK23. The other Wash Stand will be used for actual fitting onto the base.

Super glue (10 seconds cure) is used for gluing the Wash Stand to its base, and is applied with the point of a pin to both the film and wood. This author uses an old credit card to which a drop of superglue is put and then applied with a pin.

The sequence to gluing is important and Figure AK24 illustrates a suggested method.

Figure AK24 – Suggested sequence for gluing the Wash Stand to the lime wood base (previous model)
Figure AK24 – Suggested sequence for gluing the Wash Stand to the lime wood base (previous model)

Throughout the gluing process the self-closing tweezers Figure AK8, are an essential tool for holding the printed design in position on the lime wood base.

Figure AK25 and Figure AK26 illustrate how the Wash Stand can be fixed to its base, but again it is stressed it is only through diligent experimentation will a satisfactory result be achieved. This author speaks from his own personal experience!

Figure AK25 – Top of Wash Stand fixed first (previous model)
Figure AK25 – Top of Wash Stand fixed first (previous model)

Figure AK26 – Front of Wash Stand is glued (previous model)
Figure AK26 – Front of Wash Stand is glued (previous model)

The Wash Stand sides and back as illustrated in Figure AK26 are fixed, then the side extensions are glued, folded and excess from the ends removed, Figure AK27.

Figure AK27 – Side extensions folded & trimmed and leg joint superglued (previous model)
Figure AK27 – Side extensions folded & trimmed and leg joint superglued (previous model)

Using a “Conté à Paris Pencil – Sepia 617”, the edges of the Washbasin which have been ‘dash-cut’ are coloured in. It will be found the crayon helps to fill in the cuts in the film and so disguise them. The acetate edges of the two Wash Basin Flaps are painted with ‘Humbrol Matt Enamel 113’. A coat of Admiralty ‘Satin Matt Varnish’ is painted over the Washbasin.

Note: - If a small drop of Satin Matt Varnish is put in a small container and mixed with some shavings from the Sepia Crayon a paint is made which could be used to repair blemishes on the Wash Stand.

The Wash Stand mirror was originally able to be pulled up, and two brass knobs which can be seen along the top back edge of Figure AK1 would have achieved this.

The Wash Stand in Figure AK28 supports this, however when Nelson’s Shaving / Wash Stand was viewed at The National Maritime Museum the mirror was not able to be pulled out.

Figure AK28 – Nelsons Wash Stand
Figure AK28 – Nelsons Wash Stand

Seen here, Link

As with the gun carriages, the Washbasin will be fixed to the deck by 0.45mm Polyamide beading thread. To ensure good adhesion to the inside area of the Washbasin legs, they are fitted prior to painting them. Clear sticky tape holds the beading thread in place on an odd piece of wood, then superglue (10 seconds cure) is applied with a pin Figure AK29, and this is repeated for the other three legs.

Figure AK29 – Polyamide thread superglued to the inside of Wash Stand legs (previous model)
Figure AK29 – Polyamide thread superglued to the inside of Wash Stand legs (previous model)

The inside of the legs and bottom of the wooden base are painted using Humbrol Enamel Matt 113, although different paints could be used providing they produce a similar colour

Figure AK30 - Bottom of Washbasin painted (previous model)
Figure AK30 - Bottom of Washbasin painted (previous model)

Prior to fitting the Polyamide beading thread, the Wash Stand was loosely fitted in position beside the Gun Carriage in the location of the Stateroom, Figure AK31.

Figure AK31 – Wash Stand loosely positioned
Figure AK31 – Wash Stand loosely positioned

The Wash Stand in Figure AK32 has the Polyamide thread fitted and it has been loosely fitted on a scrap piece of wood showing the Wash Stand which will be eventually fitted into the Stateroom.

Figure AK32 - Polyamide thread fitted to Wash Stand
Figure AK32 - Polyamide thread fitted to Wash Stand

The Wash Stand dimensions can be seen below: -
Actual 1:64 scale dimensions = width top closed / width top open x depth x height open
6.65 / 13.30 x 6.25 x 13.60
Scale dimensions achieved = 6.70 / 13.00 x 6.00 x 13.50

Lloyd Matthews – March 2020 ©

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