HMS Fly Forecastle Bulkhead

It is not clear whether the forecastle bulkhead in the Fly would have been permanent or removable however, there are 4 guns in the forecastle and if these were used in battle there would have been much smoke. It is for this reason that it is considered the bulkhead is removable, so on this model it will be constructed with this in mind.

During the eighteenth century wooden bulkheads were used to partition the wardroom, the captain's cabin and the space under the forecastle. As Brian Lavery explains, "These were to be fitted 'in such a manner that they may be taken down or disposed of out of way of fighting the guns doing mischief by the enemy's shot in the shortest time possible'." (Lavery 1987, p175).1 Lavery also explains that the panels that were used were no more than 3 feet in width, which in 1/64 scale is approximately 14 mm and were probably constructed of deal between timber frames.

1 Lavery, Brian, 'Part VIII Accommodation; 31 - The Structure and Fitting of Cabins' in The Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War, 1600-1815, Conway Maritime Press, 24 Bride Lane, Fleet Street, London EC4Y 8DR, pp. 172-178.

Figure T1 - Original plan of H.M.S. Fly for the forecastle area
Figure T1 - Original plan of H.M.S. Fly for the forecastle area

Two windows will be fitted into the bulkhead with 4 panes of glass in each, and both sets of double doors will be able to open and close as we show in Figure T2. This forecastle bulkhead is quite challenging and we would suggest that these guidance notes are read prior to starting. The model kit does not have a forecastle bulkhead but the original plans do show it in place; we have included it to demonstrate a more varied set of modelling skills which may be of help to newly started modellers!

Figure T2 - Forecastle bulkhead with windows and moving doors
Figure T2 - Forecastle bulkhead with windows and moving doors

NOTE: - It should be stressed that the following notes are just one approach to modelling and that there are many different ways in which the same results can be achieved.

Prior to starting, the MiniCraft drill is adapted as a stationary mini sander Figure T3.

Figure T3 - MiniCraft drill adapted as a stationary sander
Figure T3 - MiniCraft drill adapted as a stationary sander

We will start with creating the forecastle bulkhead that will be positioned below Pt. No 39 Deck Beam and a plan of how this will look is shown in Figure T4.

Figure T4 - Forecastle bulkhead (print 100%)
Figure T4 - Forecastle bulkhead

This plan has been made for this authors Fly so the dimensions must be checked against the model in which it will be fitted, Figure T5.

Figure T5 - Forecastle bulkhead
Figure T5 - Forecastle bulkhead

It was found that there was sufficient material from the 1mm ply sheet which contained the gun port patterns to create the bulkhead however, as this author did not know how it would 'work out' a sheet of 1/16 inch (1.5mm) balsa wood was used for experimentation. The balsa wood samples are used in the videos below and illustrate the techniques that this author used.

Figure T4 is printed ensuring that it is set to print at 100%; this is then cut out and 3M 'Spray Mount' (Repositionable Adhesive) is used to fix it to the bulkhead.

Figure T6 - Forecastle bulkhead mounted onto 1mm ply with 3M Spray Mount
Figure T6 - Forecastle bulkhead mounted onto 1mm ply with 3M Spray Mount

The MiniCraft sander is used to remove the excess ply around the bulkhead as demonstrated in the video "Shaping the Forecastle Bulkhead". When the deck beam has been completed the bulkhead dimensions are adjusted so that it fits into the model.

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The deck beam is shaped so that it has and even thickness and curve as shown in Figure T7. This has also been illustrated in the video "Shaping Pt. No 39 Deck Beam".

Figure T7 - Shaping of the deck beam
Figure T7 - Shaping of the deck beam

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When the deck beam had been shaped it was realized that all the deck beams on the model could be shaped in this way. With this in mind the same process that was used for Pt. 39 was also used for the forecastle beams Pt. No 2a and 4a as shown in Figure T8 and Figure T9; it can be seen that the beams do appear to have a more 'realistic' look.

Figure T8 - Deck beams 2a and 4a before having their bottom edges sanded
Figure T8 - Deck beams 2a and 4a before having their bottom edges sanded

Figure T9 - Deck beams 2a and 4a after having their bottom edges sanded
Figure T9 - Deck beams 2a and 4a after having their bottom edges sanded

A groove in the bottom of the deck beam in which the forecastle bulkhead will be held is created in Pt. No 39 as illustrated in the video "Creating the Groove in the Beam". The wood bit that was used is shown in Figure T10.

Figure T10 - Wood bit used to create groove in deck beam
Figure T10 - Wood bit used to create groove in deck beam

The completed beam is shown in Figure T11.

Figure T11 - Completed deck beam Pt. No 39
Figure T11 - Completed deck beam Pt. No 39

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Adjustments will be needed to ensure that the deck beam and bulkhead fits into the model and for this a combination of sanding blocks and needle files are used. Deck beams Pt. No 2a and 4a are temporarily fitted together with the Pt. No 29 fore deck as shown in Figure T12 and Figure T13. (Note: The 'fore deck' should be Pt. No 29 and the 'poop deck' Pt. No 30 and are incorrectly named in the 'Parts List'.)

Figure T12 - The forecastle deck beams and bulkhead are shown temporarily fitted
Figure T12 - The forecastle deck beams and bulkhead are shown temporarily fitted

Figure T13 - Pt. 29 fore deck is temporarily fitted
Figure T13 - Pt. 29 fore deck is temporarily fitted

Note: In Figure T12 and Figure T13 the bulkhead is shown fitted as a complete piece however, it should be noted that the supports for the 'Riding Bitts' Pt. No 57 would need to be fitted after the 'Riding Bitts' assembly Pt. No 46/47 has been glued into place. This author decided to fit both the Riding Bitts and their Supports prior to the fixing of the bulkhead. The reason for doing this is that they can be fitted more easily without the bulkhead in position. The disadvantage of doing this is that the bulkhead will have to be cut in two to enable it to be fitted over the riding bitt supports.

The Riding Bitts are fixed in place; it was found that it was sufficient just to put adhesive on the base of the mast bit posts and the lower deck (Pt. No 19), and a little under each of the riding bit supports. These were checked to ensure that they were parallel to the deck planks and this is illustrated in Figure T14 and Figure T15.

Figure T14 - Riding bit posts are fixed to the lower deck
Figure T14 - Riding bit posts are fixed to the lower deck

Figure T15 - Riding bit supports are parallel to the deck plank joints
Figure T15 - Riding bit supports are parallel to the deck plank joints

The windows for the bulkhead are made from Pt. No 262 grating Figure T16; additional materials were purchased when making the deck gratings. Using these is this author's method for creating the window frames although there would be other ways to create them.

Figure T16 - Assembled grating set measures 33mm square and 3mm high
Figure T16 - Assembled grating set measures 33mm square and 3mm high

Six pieces of grating are assembled as shown in Figure T17.

Figure T17 - Six pieces of grating are loosely assembled
Figure T17 - Six pieces of grating are loosely assembled

Clear sticky tape is put onto a cutting mat and the grating is placed on top of it. Superglue is then 'drizzled' over all 9 joints on both sides; it does not stick to the clear sticky tape Figure T18.

Figure T18 - Superglue is used to stick the grating pieces together
Figure T18 - Superglue is used to stick the grating pieces together

Nail clippers are used to cut the excess wood away as shown in Figure T19 and Figure T20.

Figure T19 - Nail clippers are used to cut the excess wood
Figure T19 - Nail clippers are used to cut the excess wood

Figure T20 - Excess wood is removed with nail clippers
Figure T20 - Excess wood is removed with nail clippers

The remaining grating on the side is filed away as shown in Figure T21.

Figure T21 - The excess grating is filed away
Figure T21 - The excess grating is filed away

The following two figures were shot out of sequence so it will be seen that there is a lack of continuity in them.

A length of grating is cut up into small pieces and is used to fill the 6 vacant slots on one side as shown in Figure T22 and then using a pin dipped into superglue, it is 'drizzled' into the joints. This is repeated for the remaining 5 slots as shown in Figure T23

Figure T22 - Piece of grating is used to fill empty slot on one side only and then super glue is 'drizzled over the joints
Figure T22 - Piece of grating is used to fill empty slot on one side only and then super glue is 'drizzled over the joints

Figure T23 - All slots on one side of window frame are filled
Figure T23 - All slots on one side of window frame are filled

Using a piece of 1/16 inch (1.5mm) sheet balsa wood a square is made using the template in Figure T4 as a guide. This will hold the window frame securely so the excess wood in the slots can be sanded as shown in Figure T24.

Figure T24 - A square opening is made in the balsa wood to hold the window being made
Figure T24 - A square opening is made in the balsa wood to hold the window being made

The window frame is reversed so the open slots are on top and the same process is repeated until the window frame is approximately 1mm in width as seen in Figure T25.

Figure T25 - Width of window frame is approximately 1mm
Figure T25 - Width of window frame is approximately 1mm

It should be noted that the window frame is quite sturdy providing that the superglue has been allowed several hours to fully harden. Various needle files are also used to remove any excess glue and the window frames can be completed as shown in Figure T26 and are approximately the same size as the window openings in the bulkhead Figure T27.

Figure T26 - Completed window frames
Figure T26 - Completed window frames

Figure T27 - Window frames size are checked against the bulkhead
Figure T27 - Window frames size are checked against the bulkhead

The window holes in the bulkhead are first chained drilled and then the centre of each is removed as shown in Figure T28 and Figure T29. The holes are filed with needle files Figure T30, until the window frames will fit into the holes Figure T31. It is worth discretely marking the hole to the frame so each can be fitted into the correct opening.

Figure T28 - Holes are chained drilled
Figure T28 - Holes are chained drilled

Figure T29 - Centre of window opening is removed
Figure T29 - Centre of window opening is removed

Figure T30 - The window holes are filed using needle files
Figure T30 - The window holes are filed using needle files

Figure T31 - Window frames are positioned into the bulkhead
Figure T31 - Window frames are positioned into the bulkhead

The spaces for the riding bits are chain drilled and filed; the bulkhead is then taped to a cutting mat with masking tape as shown in Figure T32 ready for cutting the doors out.

WARNING: Before deciding to incorporate working doors into the forecastle bulkhead, ensure that the remaining guidance notes are fully read before starting, so the intricate modelling involved is understood before commencing this section - it is very challenging!

Figure T32 - Bulkhead taped to a cutting mat ready for cutting the forecastle doors out
Figure T32 - Bulkhead taped to a cutting mat ready for cutting the forecastle doors out

The bulkhead is made from 1mm ply and the doors will be cut out using a craft knife; this will not be easy and will require 12 new craft blades; two blades for each cut.

The first cut will be made on the starboard forecastle door on the left hand side as shown in Figure T32, but do ensure that the ply is not cut above the door or is broken. A metal ruler is also taped to the cutting mat to prevent any movement. This cut will require two blades ensuring only a very sharp one is making the cut.

Figure T33 - Metal ruler and bulkhead taped to cutting mat
Figure T33 - Metal ruler and bulkhead taped to cutting mat

The completed cut in the ply for the left hand side of the starboard forecastle door is shown in Figure T34.

Figure T34 - A clean cut has been made in the ply
Figure T34 - A clean cut has been made in the ply

The top and the other side of the starboard forecastle door is cut in the same way, securely taping both the bulkhead and ruler to the cutting mat. The door is marked in some way to ensure that each side is returned to the same position when removed. This is then cut in two as shown in Figure T35 and Figure T36.

Figure T35 - Starboard forecastle door is removed from bulkhead and taped to cutting mat
Figure T35 - Starboard forecastle door is removed from bulkhead and taped to cutting mat

Figure T36 - Starboard forecastle door is cut in two
Figure T36 - Starboard forecastle door is cut in two

When both the starboard and port doors have been cut from the bulkhead they are replaced and held into position with '18mm TAMIYA MASKING TAPE'. Using the same cutting process the bulkhead is cut into two as shown in Figure T37 and Figure T38.

Figure T37 - Bulkhead is cut into two
Figure T37 - Bulkhead is cut into two

Figure T38 - Masking tape holding the doors in place
Figure T38 - Masking tape holding the doors in place

The bulkhead is shown disassembled in Figure T39.

Figure T39 - The bulkhead is shown in its various pieces
Figure T39 - The bulkhead is shown in its various pieces

Prior to removing the paper template the bulkhead is checked on the model to determine what final adjustments are required to be made.

Figure T40 - Adjustments are made to the bulkhead
Figure T40 - Adjustments are made to the bulkhead

Note:- It was found that the initial measurements for the mast bitt support recesses were not quite correct, and when the final adjustments had been completed there was an excessive gap around the supports. This was rectified by gluing scrap pieces of deck planking with superglue to fill the gaps as shown in Figure T41, and then filed to fit the supports, Figure T42.The template shown in Figure T4 has now been adjusted and is broadly correct.

Figure T41 - Gaps in the bulkhead for the mast bitt supports had to be modified
Figure T41 - Gaps in the bulkhead for the mast bitt supports had to be modified

The paper template that was initially fixed with 3M Spray Mount on the ply can now be removed. This author found that the quickest way to do this was to pour a little 'lighter fluid' over the surface and the paper lifted of very easily; any residual adhesive is cleaned away, Figure T42.

Figure T42 - Paper template removed from ply
Figure T42 - Paper template removed from ply

The two halves of the bulkhead will need to be joined once they are in position, and for this a strip of deck planking is used; the centre joint of the forecastle bulkhead is recessed. There are various ways in which this could be done and it is important to remember that the joint is flush on both sides.

This author adapted the MiniCraft drill and it was this that was used, as shown in Figure T43, Figure T44, Figure T45 and Figure T46.

Figure T43 - An edge is created that is square to the grinding bit
Figure T43 - An edge is created that is square to the grinding bit

Figure T44 - Cards are used to adjust the height of the bulkhead to the grinding bit
Figure T44 - Cards are used to adjust the height of the bulkhead to the grinding bit

Figure T45 - Making sure that the bulkhead will be square to the grinding bit
Figure T45 - Making sure that the bulkhead will be square to the grinding bit

Figure T46 - Bulkhead is square to grinding bit
Figure T46 - Bulkhead is square to grinding bit

Recesses are made in both side of the joint as shown in Figure T47.

Figure T47 - Recesses in the centre of the forecastle bulkhead
Figure T47 - Recesses in the centre of the forecastle bulkhead

The deck plank is checked to ensure that it fits into the recess correctly and is not proud either side as we have shown in Figure T48 and Figure T49.

Figure T48 - The deck plank strip is flush in the recess
Figure T48 - The deck plank strip is flush in the recess

Figure T49 - The ply is flush on both sides
Figure T49 - The ply is flush on both sides

A small amount of adhesive is applied to one side of the recess only as illustrated in Figure T50.

Figure T50 - Adhesive is applied sparingly to one side of the recess
Figure T50 - Adhesive is applied sparingly to one side of the recess

The excess wood strip is removed and the completed centre joint is shown in Figure T51 and Figure T52.

Figure T51 - The aft side of the forecastle bulkhead
Figure T51 - The aft side of the forecastle bulkhead

Figure T52 - The forward side of the forecastle bulkhead
Figure T52 - The forward side of the forecastle bulkhead

To check that the forecastle doors would be able to open small strips of masking tape were used as temporary hinges as shown in Figure T53.

Figure T53 - Forecastle doors will be able to open and close
Figure T53 - Forecastle doors will be able to open and close

As to what the bulkhead would have actually looked like is subject to speculation but as Lavery writes, the construction was probably deal between timber frames.

The following is only this authors attempt to understand how the bulkhead could have been constructed.

Deal is a wood that is easy to saw

(Source: http://www.memidex.com/deal+wood) and comes from conifers such as pine or fir which grows reasonable quickly and have trunks of between 3 - 5 feet (approximately 1.0 - 1.5 metre).

It is conjectured that a frame was made and then large but thin sections of deal would have been laid and fixed over the frame enabling light and temporary partitions to be made with the frames giving them strength.


As Lavery explains at the beginning of this section, panels would have been 3 feet in width, and this measurement at 1/64 scale equates to 0.5625 inch (14.28mm).

The forecastle bulkhead has been designed with this in mind and it can be seen the maximum width of the window section is approximately 15mm. In Figure T54 a suggested method for bulkhead construction has been illustrated and a guide template for printing is illustrated in Figure T55.

Figure T54 - A suggested method of construction for the Forecastle Bulkhead
Figure T54 - A suggested method of construction for the Forecastle Bulkhead

Figure T55 - Bulkhead guide template for printing
Figure T55 - Bulkhead guide template for printing

The hinges for the doors are made from brass rod that is 0.2 mm diameter and brass tube that has an outside diameter of 0.5 mm and an inside diameter of 0.3 mm. This author used several mock up's of the forecastle bulkhead made from balsa wood to become accustomed to the processes being undertaken, and one of these is shown in Figure T56. It can be seen that the test hinges that have been made are approximately 1.75 mm (barrel) x 4.00 mm (arm).

Figure T56 - Mock-up of forecastle bulkhead showing the door hinges
Figure T56 - Mock-up of forecastle bulkhead showing the door hinges

Note: - For anyone that is interested in the history of hinges some information can be found at the following link - http://www.whitechapel-ltd.com/ghing.html on them.

The 0.5 mm brass tube is fully inserted in the MiniCraft drill chuck and then closed. Nail clippers are used to remove tube protruding from the chuck and the final amount is filed smooth to it as shown in Figure T57.

Figure T57 - Brass tube fully inserted in the MiniCraft drill chuck
Figure T57 - Brass tube fully inserted in the MiniCraft drill chuck

The length of tube produced is shown in Figure T58.

Figure T58 - Brass tube the exact depth of the MiniCraft drill chuck
Figure T58 - Brass tube the exact depth of the MiniCraft drill chuck

The hinge length of 1.75 mm is marked on this tube as illustrated in Figure T59.

Figure T59 - Length of the barrel of the hinge
Figure T59 - Length of the barrel of the hinge

The length of tube which was the exact depth of the MiniCraft drill chuck has 1.75 mm removed from the end as shown in Figure T60.

Figure T60 - The tube has 1.75 mm removed from one end
Figure T60 - The tube has 1.75 mm removed from one end

A length of 0.2 mm rod is superglued to a coffee stirrer or something similar, and will be used to check that the holes in the hinge barrel are clear; this is shown in Figure T61.

Figure T61 - 0.2 mm rod superglued to a coffee stirrer or something equivalent
Figure T61 - 0.2 mm rod superglued to a coffee stirrer or something equivalent

Using a pair of nail clippers the 0.5 mm tube is cut up into lengths of approximately 4 mm, Figure T62. Holding one end of each of these lengths in the MiniCraft drill chuck each end is made square by filing it with a needle file. Once a hole can be seen the tool shown in Figure T61 is used to ensure that it is clear as shown in Figure T63.

Figure T62 - Approximately 4 mm lengths of 0.5 mm tube
Figure T62 - Approximately 4 mm lengths of 0.5 mm tube

Figure T63 - The hole in the tube is checked to ensure that the 0.2 mm rod will enter
Figure T63 - The hole in the tube is checked to ensure that the 0.2 mm rod will enter

The length of tube that was reduced by 1.75 mm as shown in Figure T60 is first put into the chuck of the MiniCraft drill. A 4 mm length of tube is then put into the chuck with the 'hole end' going in first and the chuck is firmly tightened. In effect what has happened is that the 4 mm length of tube has only gone into the chuck by 1.75 mm, Figure T64.

Figure T64 - The end of the 4 mm tube with a hole is put into the chuck first
Figure T64 - The end of the 4 mm tube with a hole is put into the chuck first

The excess tube is removed with a pair of nail clippers and then with a needle file, the end is filed flush with the chuck face. The hole is checked to ensure that a 0.2 mm rod will go in. Approximately a dozen hinge barrels were produced in case any became lost and these are shown in Figure T65.

Figure T65 - Barrels for the hinges
Figure T65 - Barrels for the hinges

Scale has been a crucial factor for determining the size of the hinges and it can be seen in Figure T66 that the choice of a 0.5 mm tube looks correct when placed on the template of the door.

Figure T66 - Barrels for the hinges placed beside the forecastle door
Figure T66 - Barrels for the hinges placed beside the forecastle door

The image shown in Figure T55 needs to be drawn onto the ply forecastle bulkhead so the planks can be accurately positioned. There are various ways that this can be achieved but this author chose to use a set square and drawing board so this is what will be described.

The ply bulkhead needs to be held on the drawing board to prevent it from moving, so the shape of the bulkhead was cut in a flat cereal box and it was this that was taped to the drawing board as shown in Figure T67 and Figure T68, ensuring that the bulkhead was square to the drawing board ruler.

Figure T67 - Forecastle bulkhead is held square on the drawing board
Figure T67 - Forecastle bulkhead is held square on the drawing board

Figure T68 - Forecastle bulkhead is held in position on the drawing board
Figure T68 - Forecastle bulkhead is held in position on the drawing board

The positions of the planks are drawn onto the bulkhead as shown in Figure T69 and these are then used as a guide when fixing the planks to the bulkhead.

Please refer to 'Stateroom, Coach and Great Cabin Partitions Figures AD6 to AD15 for an improved method of putting the planking design on the bulkhead.

Figure T69 - The position of the planks are drawn onto the bulkhead
Figure T69 - The position of the planks are drawn onto the bulkhead

A 4 mm deck plank is cut to the required widths as drawn in Figure T69 but use the same length of plank for both sides of the bulkhead; for example the same cut plank has been used on both sides of the centre of the bulkhead as shown in Figure T70.

The planks down the centre of the bulkhead are fitted first ensuring that glue is only put on the underside of the plank as the two bulkhead halves will need to be separated as shown in Figure T70 and Figure T71. A pin is used to apply the adhesive to the bulkhead and it is important to use the minimum amount as is necessary to fix the plank. This avoids excess adhesive from squeezing out.

Figure T70 - Planks are fixed either side of the centre bulkhead joint ensuring that they can be separated into two halves
Figure T70 - Planks are fixed either side of the centre bulkhead joint ensuring that they can be separated into two halves

Figure T71 - The two bulkhead halves can be separated
Figure T71 - The two bulkhead halves can be separated

Planks are fitted around both the port and starboard double doors ensuring that the doors can be removed as shown in Figure T72 and Figure T73.

Figure T72 - Ensure the door joints remain free of glue
Figure T72 - Ensure the door joints remain free of glue

Figure T73 - Ensure that the doors can be removed
Figure T73 - Ensure that the doors can be removed

The top, bottom and middle door planks are fitted, Figure T74 ensuring that the outside edges are trimmed to the exact size of the doors. The door hinge arm supports are fitted as shown in Figure T75.

Figure T74 - Top, bottom and middle door planks are fitted
Figure T74 - Top, bottom and middle door planks are fitted

Figure T75 - Door hinge arm supports are fitted
Figure T75 - Door hinge arm supports are fitted

The remaining planks are glued to both halves of the bulkhead as shown in Figure T76.

Figure T76 - Forecastle bulkhead fully planked
Figure T76 - Forecastle bulkhead fully planked

The bulkhead is now sanded but it is important that both halves are done together so the bulkhead thickness remains constant on both sides. The bulkhead was placed on a flat piece of ply and thin pieces of wood were glued in the window space on the ply as shown in Figure T77; this would prevent it from moving when using the sanding tool Figure T78.

Figure T77 - The bulkhead is held in position on a piece of ply for sanding
Figure T77 - The bulkhead is held in position on a piece of ply for sanding

Figure T78 - Sanding tool made from scraps of wood
Figure T78 - Sanding tool made from scraps of wood

Once the bulkhead surface has been sanded the excess wood around the edge of the bulkhead is removed. Any excess glue on the ply surface is gently removed with water and a stiff paint brush as shown in Figure T79; the adhesive used is water soluble (EVO-STIK WOOD ADHESIVE Resin W).

Figure T79 - Excess adhesive is removed from the ply surface with water
Figure T79 - Excess adhesive is removed from the ply surface with water

A final fit is completed to ensure that it sits comfortably into the model and final adjustments are made. The end result should appear something like that shown in Figure T80, Figure T81 and Figure T82 prior to its painting or staining.

Figure T80 - Completed bulkhead prior to its painting or staining
Figure T80 - Completed bulkhead prior to its painting or staining

Figure T81 - Bulkhead loosely fitted into model
Figure T81 - Bulkhead loosely fitted into model

Figure T82 - Bulkhead doors are checked to ensure that they will open freely
Figure T82 - Bulkhead doors are checked to ensure that they will open freely

It was found that the forward facing centre edges of the doors were lightly chamfered to ensure smooth opening and closing as shown in Figure T83.

Figure T83 - Middle door edges lightly chamfered
Figure T83 - Middle door edges lightly chamfered

The window frames are painted with Humbrol Matt Black 33 and when dry are placed on the sticky end of 'Post-it' index markers as shown in Figure T84.

Figure T84 - Painted window frames
Figure T84 - Painted window frames

They are finally fitted into the bulkhead with any minor adjustments to the size of the ply opening for the window being made; Figure T85 shown both windows loosely fitted.

Figure T85 - Window frames loosely fitted into bulkhead
Figure T85 - Window frames loosely fitted into bulkhead

Both painting and staining the bulkhead was tested and the conclusion was personal taste. 'RONSEAL Woodstain Satin WALNUT' was used as this wood is used for components in the kit. It is water based and the end result is shown in Figure T86 and Figure T87. In retrospect it would have probably been better to have used a "matt" finish.

Figure T86 - Walnut stained bulkhead
Figure T86 - Walnut stained bulkhead

Figure T87 - Stained bulkhead shown loosely in position (under lights)
Figure T87 - Stained bulkhead shown loosely in position (under lights)

Achieving the desired shade for the bulkhead was very much 'trial and error'. This author will explain the process of how the stain colour in Figure T87 was obtained, but it is felt that there is probably an easier way.

Three small pots were used; the first contained neat wood stain, the second mixed with 75 % wood stain with 25% water, and the third was 50% wood stain and 50% water. The sequence of events for the side of the bulkhead with the planks was:-
1. 50% mix used over planks and ply
2. 75% mix was applied to the ply surface only
3. 50% mix on the planks only
4. Neat stain applied to the surface of the planks only
5. The surface of the bulkhead was lightly sanded
6. Neat stain was applied all over
7. 75% mix was applied to plank surface only

Note: Between the coats of wood stain the doors were removed and put back to ensure that they did not become stuck together with the stain.

As shown in Figure T54 the two middle section joints were more clearly defined. This was achieved with a craft knife and these two sections are shown in Figure T88.

Figure T88 - Two middle section joints defined
Figure T88 - Two middle section joints defined

The edges of the doors and bulkhead are stained using the75% stain and 25% water; this mix is used so the stain is absorbed into the wood and does not change the fit of the doors in the bulkhead, Figure T89.

Figure T89 - The edges of the doors and bulkhead are stained
Figure T89 - The edges of the doors and bulkhead are stained

The window frames have clear plastic stuck behind them, and to do this '3M Craft Mount Permanent Adhesive' is used. Using spray adhesive, the areas of the window frame that do not require adhesive will need to be protected.

The sides of the frame are protected by placing the frames into some cardboard as shown in Figure T90; in this case three layers of cereal box were stuck with the spray adhesive. Photocopies of the frame were then stuck onto it ensuring to mark which was port and which was starboard Figure T90. This is a good time to experiment with the spray adhesive to see the best method for applying it; i.e. how far to hold the nozzle away, how long each spray should be etc.

Figure T90 - Photocopies of the frames are fixed onto the cereal box cardboard
Figure T90 - Photocopies of the frames are fixed onto the cereal box cardboard

The copies of the frame are cut out and the actual frames are placed in the openings so that their sides do not get adhesive sprayed on to them, Figure T91.

Figure T91 - Window frames are placed into the openings in the cardboard and 8 cardboard pieces placed into the frames
Figure T91 - Window frames are placed into the openings in the cardboard and 8 cardboard pieces placed into the frames

Adhesive is sprayed onto the window frames and then these frames are cut away from the cardboard as shown in Figure T92, Figure T93 and the frame remains with the 4 pieces of cardboard as shown in Figure T94.

Figure T92 - Cardboard is cut away from frame
Figure T92 - Cardboard is cut away from frame

Figure T93 - Cardboard is cut away from frame
Figure T93 - Cardboard is cut away from frame

Figure T94 - Window frame showing spray adhesive and 4 cardboard pieces
Figure T94 - Window frame showing spray adhesive and 4 cardboard pieces

Holding the frame with a pair of tweezers the 4 cardboard pieces are pushed out then the frame is fixed onto a clear piece of plastic as shown in Figure T95.

Figure T95 - Window frames fixed to clear plastic
Figure T95 - Window frames fixed to clear plastic

The clear plastic used was 10 thousandth of an inch thick (0.254 mm) and was the packaging used from 'Boots expert Dental TePe Interdental tooth brushes' as shown in Figure T96, but in reality any suitable clear plastic can be used.

Figure T96 - Packaging used for window pane
Figure T96 - Packaging used for window pane

The window frames are cut from the plastic using a chisel craft knife; the flat of the blade is held against to frame and then pressure is gently exerted downwards. This prevents any stress being placed on the adhesive and frame. Needle files will be required to make final minor adjustments prior to fitting into the bulkhead as shown in Figure T97.

Figure T97 - The windows are loosely fitted into the bulkhead
Figure T97 - The windows are loosely fitted into the bulkhead

The frames are not yet permanently fitted so they are placed on two 'Post-it' index tabs to identify which is port and starboard and also which side is the top of the frame. This is shown in Figure T98.

Figure T98 - Window frames are kept on 'Post-it' index tabs prior to permanent fitting
Figure T98 - Window frames are kept on 'Post-it' index tabs prior to permanent fitting

The hinge barrels could be superglued direct to the bulkhead, but a test piece showed that this was not completely secure due to the small area of the barrel that could be glued. It was therefore decided that a piece of rod would be soldered to the hinge barrel which could be inserted through the bulkhead, creating a permanent fixture; Figure T99. To achieve this will require a certain amount of practice, patience and sharp eyes!

Figure T99 - Fixing of barrel to bulkhead
Figure T99 - Fixing of barrel to bulkhead

There would be many different ways to achieve the above result and the following is but one: -
A small soldering iron Figure T100, solder, flux and a pair of nail clippers will be required.

Figure T100 - Small soldering iron
Figure T100 - Small soldering iron

A heat resistant material is used to create a simple template to hold the barrel and rod in place whilst they are being soldered as shown in Figure T101.

Figure T101 - A heat resistant material is used to create a template for soldering the barrel and rod
Figure T101 - A heat resistant material is used to create a template for soldering the barrel and rod

Using the nail clippers, a small piece of solder is cut as shown in Figure T102; the barrel and rod are placed in the heat resistant template as illustrated in Figure T103.

Please refer to Figure AD17 for an improvement for the soldering template.

Figure T102 - A small piece of solder
Figure T102 - A small piece of solder

Figure T103 - Barrel and rod placed in the heat resistant template
Figure T103 - Barrel and rod placed in the heat resistant template

Solder and flux is placed on the join as shown in Figure T104.

Figure T104 - Solder and flux are placed onto the join
Figure T104 - Solder and flux are placed onto the join

The hot soldering iron is applied to the join and the barrel and rod will be soldered as shown in Figure T105.

Figure T105 - The barrel and rod are soldered together
Figure T105 - The barrel and rod are soldered together

This is then removed and wiped clean of flux Figure T106.

Figure T106 - Flux is wiped away from the joint
Figure T106 - Flux is wiped away from the joint

The barrel is checked to ensure that it is clear as shown in Figure T107.

Figure T107 - Check that the barrel is clear
Figure T107 - Check that the barrel is clear

It is suggested that at least 12 are attempted and the best 8 can be selected as we have shown in Figure T108.

Figure T108 - Completed barrels with soldered rods
Figure T108 - Completed barrels with soldered rods

The fitting of the hinges is a 'very fiddly' operation and great patience is required. It is probably better to do this for short periods of time only and never try to hurry what you are doing.

The sequence of assembling the hinges will be detailed but there may not be continuity with the pictures, the simple reason being that it is very difficult to take photographs especially if something does not work out. Please remember that like you this is the first time that this author has done anything like this and is learning all the time!

First ensure that the doors are securely held in place to the bulkhead with modelling masking tape; this is put on the reverse side of the bulkhead halves. Place some masking tape down the side of each door, and then mark a line 1 mm from the outer door edge as shown in Figure T109.

Figure T109 - Masking tape is used for marking barrel positions on the bulkhead
Figure T109 - Masking tape is used for marking barrel positions on the bulkhead

A hinge arm is made from 0.2 mm brass rod as shown in Figure T110.

Figure T110 - Hinge arms are made from 0.2 mm brass rod using the cutting mat as a guide
Figure T110 - Hinge arms are made from 0.2 mm brass rod using the cutting mat as a guide

This is then checked for size against the door as shown in Figure T108, and this process is repeated for all 4 arms.

Figure T111 - Hinge arm checked against the door
Figure T111 - Hinge arm checked against the door

The hinge arm is placed into the 0.5 mm brass tube, Figure T112.

Figure T112 - The hinge arm is placed into 0.5 mm tube
Figure T112 - The hinge arm is placed into 0.5 mm tube

The brass tube with the hinge arm inside is held in place with masking tape and a drop of superglue fixes the hinge arm to the door as shown in Figure T110.

Figure T113 - A drop of superglue fixes the hinge arm to the door
Figure T113 - A drop of superglue fixes the hinge arm to the door

The barrel hinges with the soldered rod are each fitted to the hinge arms and held in place with a little masking tape as we have shown in Figure T114 and the rod positions are marked on the masking tape.

Figure T114 - Hinge barrels are positioned and the hinge arms and marked
Figure T114 - Hinge barrels are positioned and the hinge arms and marked

The positions of the soldered rods as they are placed on the door frame are placed on a piece of paper and fixed with masking tape as we have shown in Figure T115.

Figure T115 - The barrel hinges are marked and positioned on the paper according to their relative positions on the door frame
Figure T115 - The barrel hinges are marked and positioned on the paper according to their relative positions on the door frame

Having marked the rod position of the hinge barrel, holes are drilled using an 80 gauge drill, and this is shown in Figure T116, together with the double doors.

Figure T116 - Holes are drilled for the hinge barrels
Figure T116 - Holes are drilled for the hinge barrels

The holes are then countersunk using a 72 gauge drill as shown in Figure T117.

Figure T117 - Holes are countersunk
Figure T117 - Holes are countersunk

The masking tape is removed and the barrels are placed into the correct frame holes ensuring that the mark on each barrel is facing the correct way as shown in Figure T118.

Figure T118 - The barrels are placed into the door frame
Figure T118 - The barrels are placed into the door frame

The bottom hinge arm is placed into the bottom barrel first followed by the top and then the door is fixed in place with masking tape. The second door is assembled in the same fashion. The reverse side of the doors are held in place with masking tape and a drop of superglue is fixed to each of the barrel rods. The bottom hinge arms are bent at approximately 45 degrees and this will prevent the doors from coming 'unhinged'. This sequence of events is illustrated in Figure T119, Figure T120, Figure T121, Figure T122, Figure T122 and Figure T122.

Figure T119 - Bottom hinge arm put into the bottom barrel first
Figure T119 - Bottom hinge arm put into the bottom barrel first

Figure T120 - Top hinge arm is put into the top barrel
Figure T120 - Top hinge arm is put into the top barrel

Figure T121 - Bottom hinge arm is put into the bottom barrel
Figure T121 - Bottom hinge arm is put into the bottom barrel

Figure T122 - The top hinge arm is put into the top barrel
Figure T122 - The top hinge arm is put into the top barrel

Figure T123 - The barrel rods are fixed with a drop of superglue
Figure T123 - The barrel rods are fixed with a drop of superglue


Please click on this "Link" to find an improvement to fixing the barrels of the hinges as explained in the Cabin Partitions pages.

Figure T124 - The bottom hinge arms are bent at approximately 45 degrees
Figure T124 - The bottom hinge arms are bent at approximately 45 degrees

As described in Figure T120 the excess hinge rods at the bottom of the barrels are reasonably easy to remove; slide an index card beneath the bottom of the hinge rod and using a chisel craft knife with a new blade gently push down and the excess rod can be cut away. The excess barrel rods are removed with nail clippers and filed smooth with a flat needle file.

Additional superglue is applied to the arms and the side of the hinge barrels ensuring that everything is firmly in place as shown in Figure T125. WARNING: - DO NOT GET ANY SUPERGLUE NEAR THE HINGE ARM AND THE BARREL AS THIS MEANS THAT THE WHOLE HINGE WILL NEED TO BE REPLACED.....as happened with this author twice!!

Figure T125 - Additional superglue is applied to the hinge arms and the side of the barrels with a pin.
Figure T125 - Additional superglue is applied to the hinge arms and the side of the barrels with a pin.

WARNING: - DO NOT LET THE SUPERGLUE GET NEAR THE BARREL AND HINGE ARMS

The hinge arms and barrels could be painted but this author decided to apply several coats of the wood stain so that they would blend in with the bulkhead as shown in Figure T126.

Figure T126 - The door hinges fixed to the forecastle bulkhead
Figure T126 - The door hinges fixed to the forecastle bulkhead

A small detail but a little sewing machine oil is put on all eight hinges to ensure the smooth opening and closing of the doors. A small amount of oil is placed in a container and a very fine paint brush is used apply it at the top and bottom of the hinges as we have shown in Figure T127.

Figure T127 - Sewing machine oil is applied to all eight hinges
Figure T127 - Sewing machine oil is applied to all eight hinges

The forecastle bulkhead is loosely fitted into the model with the deck beam Pt. No 39 and minor adjustments may need to be made to ensure that the doors open. For this needle files are used.

The reverse side of the double doors are painted with several coats of walnut wood stain as shown in Figure T128.

Figure T128 - Wood stain is applied to the reverse side of the double doors
Figure T128 - Wood stain is applied to the reverse side of the double doors

The reverse side of the bulkhead is then painted with two coats of White Humbrol Matt 34 as shown in Figure T129.

Figure T129 - The reverse side of the bulkhead is painted matt white
Figure T129 - The reverse side of the bulkhead is painted matt white

The windows are fitted into the bulkhead ensuring that the correct relative positions are maintained. For this author they were a 'push' fit into the bulkhead but still a small amount of PVA adhesive was put between the frame and the bulkhead with a pin and then wiped away with the finger gently pressing the adhesive in. Shining a torch behind the window frame shows where there is a gap between the frame and bulkhead and this is where the adhesive is put, Figure T130. A damp tissue can be used to wipe away any excess adhesive before it dries.

Figure T130 - PVA adhesive is put between the frame and bulkhead
Figure T130 - PVA adhesive is put between the frame and bulkhead

On half of the reverse side of the forecastle bulkhead with the window frame fixed in is shown in Figure T131.

Figure T131 - The window frame fixed with PVA into the bulkhead
Figure T131 - The window frame fixed with PVA into the bulkhead

Much thought was given to the door handles but it was decided that very fine pins would be used; these are known as 'wedding dress' pins as shown in Figure T132.

Figure T132 - A wedding dress pin
Figure T132 - A wedding dress pin

These pins are made of very hard steel and are difficult to work with. The main problem is to ensure that each pin head that is cut is of the same length as they cannot be filed.

A small spacer was created out of a scrap piece of plastic that had been kept for such an eventuality as shown in Figure T133.

Figure T133 - A spacer is made from a scrap piece of plastic
Figure T133 - A spacer is made from a scrap piece of plastic

The spacer is placed on the pin as shown in Figure T134.

Figure T134 - Spacer is placed on pin
Figure T134 - Spacer is placed on pin

The pin and spacer is put into wire cutting pliers as shown in Figure T135 and Figure T136.

Figure T135 - Pin and spacer held in a pair of wire cutting pliers
Figure T135 - Pin and spacer held in a pair of wire cutting pliers

Figure T136 - Reverse side of the pliers
Figure T136 - Reverse side of the pliers

The pin is cut and the pin head and spacer is shown in Figure T137.

Figure T137 - Pin head and spacer
Figure T137 - Pin head and spacer

This process is repeated four times using the same spacer so ensuring that the 4 door handles are of the same length. Pin prick marks are made for where the door handles will be placed as shown in Figure T138.

Figure T138 - Pin pricks are made for where the door handle holes will be drilled
Figure T138 - Pin pricks are made for where the door handle holes will be drilled

A 71 gauge drill is used to make the holes for the door handles as shown in Figure T139.

Figure T139 - Holes for the door handles are drilled
Figure T139 - Holes for the door handles are drilled

This author found it was helpful just to enlarge the holes with the point of the tweezers. When the pin is cut the diameter is flattened (Figure T137) and this will help to ease the door handles in, which are then pushed into the holes. A drop of superglue is put into the holes on the reverse side of the doors. When dry the hole marks are touched up with wood stain. The completed door handles are shown in Figure T140.

Figure T140 - Door handles fitted
Figure T140 - Door handles fitted

The completed bulkhead is shown in Figure T141, Figure T142 and Figure T143.

Figure T141 - Completed forecastle bulkhead
Figure T141 - Completed forecastle bulkhead

Figure T142 - Reverse side of the completed forecastle bulkhead
Figure T142 - Reverse side of the completed forecastle bulkhead

Figure T143 - Completed forecastle bulkhead loosely positioned into the model
Figure T143 - Completed forecastle bulkhead loosely positioned into the model

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A video has been made to demonstrate the movement of the double doors as were shown on the original building plans for H.M.S. Fly. This video is titled " Forecastle Bulkhead Double Doors".

This has been a rather long project but it does demonstrate the use of simple 'scratch modelling' techniques and it is hoped that this "Fly On The Wall" illustration will be of use to fellow modellers.

Lloyd Matthews – July 2015 ©

WOW!!! Lloyd you have given us a fantastic addition to this build. The swinging doors are awesome, this is becoming an extremely authentic project. Thank you.

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