H.M.S Fly Welsh Dresser

Coach Cabin Welsh Dresser (Scale 1:64)

Whilst looking for reference points for furnishing of the cabins, a cutaway of the H. M. Bark Endeavour illustrated how the officers stored their personal crockery, glassware, cutlery and linen in a piece of furniture that was similar to a Welsh Dresser, Figure AL1

 

Figure AL1 - Furniture for storing personal items of officers
Figure AL1 - Furniture for storing personal items of officers

The height of this furniture is limited by the height within the Coach Cabin, which for this authors model was measured 27.75mm, Figure AL3. It will be made to a height of 27mm which represent a full-scale height of 1728mm or 68ins.

A mid eighteenth century Welsh Dresser was used for reference and can be seen at https://www.1stdibs.co.uk/furniture/storage-case-pieces/dressers/antique-oak-dresser-rack/id-f_4192213/, Figure AL2. This has the correct scale width to fit into the Coach Cabin, however the overall scale height of this dresser is 31.97mm, so its height will need to be reduced to fit into the Coach Cabin.

Figure AL2 – Welsh Dresser circa 1730
Figure AL2 – Welsh Dresser circa 1730

Actual dimensions given on website are: -

H 196.85 cm x W 137.16 cm x D 50.8 cm
H 77.5 in. x W 54 in. x D 20 in.

As the top half of the Welsh Dresser has to be estimated, the depth and height of the shelved and height of the bottom cupboard aremarked with an Asterix (*).

BOTTOM CUPBOARD measurements taken from Figure AL2
Dimensions = width x depth x height
Inches = 54ins x 20ins x 35.6ins*
Millimetres = 1371.6mm x 508mm x 905.6mm*
1:64 scale = 21.44mm x 7.94mm x 14.15mm*

TOP SHELVES measurements taken from Figure AL2
Dimensions = width x depth x height
Inches = 54ins x 9.47ins* x 44.92ins*
Millimetres = 1371.6mm x 240.57mm* x 1141mm*
1:64 scale = 21.44mm x 3.76mm* x 17.82mm*

It must be noted that the overall scale height of the Welsh Dresser shown above = 14.15mm + 17.82mm = 31.97mm. The actual height able to fit into the Coach Cabin is 27mm, so the scale height of Figure AL2 will need to be reduced however, this should not be a problem. The width of the Welsh Dresser is 21.44mm and the space between the Stateroom partition and inboard port door to the Great Cabin is approximately 22mm depending upon the actual build.

Figure AL3 – Measuring underside of Poop Decking
Figure AL3 – Measuring underside of Poop Decking

This author has removed the top headboard and the bottom feet of the Welsh Dresser so the scale height is now 27mm. Additional pewter plates, china plates have been added onto the shelves and three ‘1776’ pewter mugs have been hung from the shelf top. The measurements for the Welsh Dresser to fit into the Coach Cabin are: -

BOTTOM CUPBOARD
Dimensions = width x total depth / (cupboard top) x height
1:64 scale = 21.4mm x 7.9mm /(4.2mm) x 12.0mm

TOP SHELVES
Dimensions = width x depth x height
1:64 scale = 21.4mm x 3.8mm x 15.0mm

The image in Figure AL4 is based upon the above measurements and is printed scale 1:1 on 80gsm plain copier paper at best quality. Authors printer - Epson Stylus Office BX450FW Plus, print setting: - plain papers, photo.

Figure AL4 – Image for Welsh Dresser printed scale 1:1
Figure AL4 – Image for Welsh Dresser printed PDF below at scale 1:1

Click HERE for Welsh Dresser PDF, print at 1:1 sale

A wooden base is constructed from patterns on which the image Figure AL4 is glued, and for this a template has been made; to ensure the width and depth is correct a further template is made, Figure AL5.

This author will always have a good look around ‘Haberdashery’ departments as many useful items can be found which can be utilised for modelling. ‘Sew Group International’ produce a ‘Template Plastic Plain’ Item Number ER398, which was ideal for these templates however, any suitable acetate plastic could be used providing it is of a suitable thickness. For example, plastic report covers could be used.

Figure AL5 – Templates for Welsh Dresser (print scale 1:1)
Figure AL5 – Templates for Welsh Dresser (print scale 1:1)

The patterns for the wooden base of the Welsh Dresser are shown in Figure AL6, and when gluing them to the Lime wood, ensure the same method as explained in the Writing Desk is used (Figures AI9 & AI10). (Writing Desk Link for explination)

Patterns for the Welsh Dresser (print scale 1:1)
Patterns for the Welsh Dresser (print scale 1:1)

Fourteen patterns are shown in Figure AL6, although only thirteen will actually be used. A chisel craft knife is used to cut approximately around the patterns. A rotary grinding wheel shown in Figure AL7 is used with 400 GRIT (MEDIUM) Wet & Dry Paper. This author makes the circular discs, and with double-sided sticky tape fixes them to the rotary attachment. It was found that if a coarser sanding paper was used it splintered the wood.

The pattern will need to be at the correct height for the edges to be sanded; this author found that one circular grit disc lasted for two patterns and then had to be changed.

Figure AL7 – Rotary Grinding Wheel
Figure AL7 – Rotary Grinding Wheel

A small 1.6mm hole was drilled into the patterns as illustrated in Figure AL8; it made creating the inside corner a lot easier.

Figure AL8 – 1.6mm hole drilled in the inside corner of the pattern
Figure AL8 – 1.6mm hole drilled in the inside corner of the pattern

It is important that each pattern fits into the templates as shown in the pictures of Figure AL9: -

1 - The width of the top part of the pattern fits into the template.
2 - The width of the bottom part of the pattern fits into the template.
3 / 4 – This is a combination of the top and bottom parts of the pattern fitting into the template.
5 – The complete pattern fits snugly into the template.

Remember, do not adjust the back of the pattern as shown in Figure AL6.

This is a process which requires plenty of patience and is completed over a period of a few days; try and fit each pattern with an equal ‘feel’ into the template. This author used an adjustable 360-degree table vice when using a flat needle file for the final adjustments. Link here.

Figure AL9 – Sequence for fitting the pattern into the template
Figure AL9 – Sequence for fitting the pattern into the template

The paper is removed from the patterns as described in the Writing Desk Figure AI12. (Link here for explination)

The patterns are glued together; Figure AL10 illustrates how they are kept square and the back edge of the pattern is positioned on the cutting mat.

Figure AL10 – Sequence for assembling and gluing the patterns
Figure AL10 – Sequence for assembling and gluing the patterns

1 – A piece of paper is placed on the cutting mat so the patterns do not end up stuck to it. The small metal Engineer’s Square is fixed to the cutting mat by its Stock with two-sided sticky tape. The blade is supported with a piece of wood of the correct height. To fill the gap between the Blade and the cutting mat a length of Right Angled Brass is used. The bottom of the Stock of a larger Engineer’s Square is used to push the patterns together. The base of the pattern is placed against the Stock, and the side against the Brass Right Angle.

2 - EVO-STICK is evenly applied to the side of another pattern with a paint brush, and this is pushed to the pattern against the Blade. The bottom of the larger Stock is then used to push the two patterns, squarely and firmly together against the Blade of the smaller Engineers Square. This is repeated for 13 patterns ensuring that they are always pushed squarely together.

3 – When the glue has dried, it is removed and the paper taken away from the back.

Note: - If for any reason the wooden base does not come out as planned, e.g. it is not square do not despair. Soak the completed base in warm water leaving it overnight; in the morning the patterns can be easily separated, cleaned and allowed to dry. The process can then be repeated; this author had to do exactly that!

The completed wooden base will need to be fitted into the templates, Figure AL5. Figure AL11 illustrates this.

Figure AL11 – Wooden base fitted into the templates
Figure AL11 – Wooden base fitted into the templates

1 - Wooden base is adjusted for the ‘width and depth of Welsh Dresser cupboard’.
2 - Wooden base is adjusted for the ‘width and depth of Welsh Dresser shelves’.
3 - Wooden base is adjusted so that the Welsh Dresser will fit through the template.

The wooden base for the Welsh Dresser was finished to fit the templates by using the following method. P120 Aluminium Oxide Liberty Green Paper was used, and putting a
Figure AL11 – Wooden base fitted into the templates sheet of Oxide Paper on a flat surface Numbers 14, Figure AL12, the different edges were sanded.

Number 5 illustrates how an edge of a desk was used to sand the front of the Shelves.

Number 6 illustrates a flat needle file being used to fit the top of the Cupboard into the template.

Figure AL12 – Sanding the different edges of the Welsh Dresser to fit into the templates
Figure AL12 – Sanding the different edges of the Welsh Dresser to fit into the templates

A mistake was made at this point, which was corrected after the Welsh Dresser had been completed, so the photographs are out of sequence between Figure AL13 and Figure AL14.

At this point the Welsh Dresser should be checked in situ on the model; it was found that due to the slight camber of the deck, it did not sit correctly on its base. Four corner feet were made from a scrap piece of 0.5 x 3mm Tanganyika (used for the deck) as shown in Figure AL13; this corrected the error.

Figure AL13 – Four feet added to base of Welsh Dresser
Figure AL13 – Four feet added to base of Welsh Dresser

Tissue paper had been wrapped around to ensure that the image was not damaged during this operation; the feet were painted the same colour as the base and back. Exerting a gentle pressure, the Welsh Dresser was carefully drawn across a flat piece of 400 GRIT (Medium) Wet & Dry Paper in all directions to ensure the feet are level.

Check also that the Welsh Dresser will fit beneath the Poop Deck as illustrated in Figure AL14

Figure AL14 – Check height of the Welsh Dresser in situ
Figure AL14 – Check height of the Welsh Dresser in situ

The image for the Welsh Dresser Figure AL4 is printed and Figure AL15 shows where the reverse side of the image is scored.

Figure AL15 – Score the reverse side of the image
Figure AL15 – Score the reverse side of the image

First short cuts are made in the ‘Red Lines’ on the image, and these are used as a guide for scoring on the reverse side; the ‘TAB’ is scored on the image side. The image is cut out using an X-ACTO Z series 11, and is shown in Figure AL16.

Figure AL16 – Cut-out image loosely fitted to wooden base
Figure AL16 – Cut-out image loosely fitted to wooden base

1 - Cut-out image and fold along the crease lines.

2 - A hole for a toothpick was drilled into the base. The image is fitted onto the wooden base and Tamiya Masking Tape is used to fix the ‘TAB’ onto the base. The toothpick is inserted and is used to hold the Welsh Dresser when the image is being glued to the base; this further secures the image in place.

The image is glued to the base using EVO-STIK and in the sequence shown in Figure AL17.

Figure AL17 – Sequence of gluing the image onto the wooden base
Figure AL17 – Sequence of gluing the image onto the wooden base

This author used 1 in / 25 cm ‘Foam Paint Brush’ for pressing the image onto the wooden base. This is shown in Figure AL18 together with the glued image of the Welsh Dresser.

Figure AL18 – Foam brush and image glued to wooden base
Figure AL18 – Foam brush and image glued to wooden base

It must be stressed that if the first attempt at fixing the image onto the wooden base is not successful, then it can easily be removed using water and a ‘PIAS’ Eye Brow Brush, Figure AL19.

Figure AL19 – Image removed from wooden base
Figure AL19 – Image removed from wooden base

Two coats of Satin Matt Varnish are applied to the image, and the base and back of Welsh Dresser are painted with a colour that is close to the overall image colour. This author used a mix of ‘Humbrol’ Acrylic 20 with a touch of ‘Admiralty Paints’ Matt (metal) Black however, different paints could be used providing they produce a similar colour.

As a finishing touch 3 coats of ‘Humbrol Gloss Cote’ was applied to the chinaware on the shelves of the Welsh Dresser, Figure AL20.

Figure AL20 – Humbrol Gloss Cote applied to the chinaware on the shelves
Figure AL20 – Humbrol Gloss Cote applied to the chinaware on the shelves

The completed Welsh Dresser is shown in Figure AL21, placed in the Coach Cabin of H.M.S. Fly. Its dimensions are: -

BOTTOM CUPBOARD
Dimensions = width x depth x height
1:64 scale = 21.5mm x 7.5mm x 11.6mm

TOP SHELVES
Dimensions = width x depth x height
1:64 scale = 21.5mm x 3.9mm x 15.0mm

Figure AL 21 – Welsh Dresser in H.M.S. Fly’s Coach Cabin
Figure AL 21 – Welsh Dresser in H.M.S. Fly’s Coach Cabin

Lloyd Matthews – May 2019 ©

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