Mistakes and Corrections


GUN PORT PATTERN

Part 1

Mistakes will always be made when building a model of this complexity, especially if one has had no previous experience for this type of build. This has been exampled in 'Gun Port Patterns (Part 1 of 2) where the port forward Gun Port Pattern is not exactly aligned with the top edge of the bulkheads Figure M1. Initially it was thought that this small error could be ignored however, after several weeks of reflection it was decided to correct it.

Fwd Gun Port Pattern slightly proud along the top of the bulkheads
Figure M1 - Fwd Gun Port Pattern slightly proud along the top of the bulkheads

The heights of the starboard gun ports were measured, and these measurements transferred to the port side.

Use an odd strip of deck planking, place on the inside of a starboard Gun Port, and mark the lower edge on the strip Figure M2. Move the strip to the corresponding Gun Port on the port side and measure its height; the difference between the two marks is the amount of correction on the port Gun Port. This is then marked at both the bottom and top of the Gun Port Figure M3 and M4.

This operation is carried out to determined the amount of correction for each port Gun Port, and also for the deck sea drains Figure M5. The ply to be removed from the top of the Gun Port pattern is also marked Figure M5.

Figure M2 - Marking the height of starboard Gun Port
Figure M2 - Marking the height of starboard Gun Port

Figure M3 - Difference at the bottom of Gun Port marked on the port side
Figure M3 - Difference at the bottom of Gun Port marked on the port side

Figure M4 - Difference at the top of Gun Port marked on the port side
Figure M4 - Difference at the top of Gun Port marked on the port side

Figure M5 - Corrections marked on port Gun Port Pattern
Figure M5 - Corrections marked on port Gun Port Pattern

It  was decided to correct the top of each Gun Port first, but if this was too difficult to achieve, everything could be left as it was and no correction made. The top infill for each Gun Port / Sea Drain is made from a scrap piece of ply; the existing laser cut edge would form the inside of the Gun Port / Sea Drain Figure M6.

Figure M6 - Cutting the infill for the top of Gun Port
Figure M6 - Cutting the infill for the top of Gun Port

Note: Whatever scrap ply is used it is important to ensure that the grain is in the direction shown, so it will easily bend in the gun port Figure M6.

Through experimentation it was found that the top infill's could be fitted, albeit it was rather fiddly. When they were all fitted, the bottom of the Gun Ports / Sea Drains were removed using needle files Figure M7. It is advisable not to rush this correction at any stage, otherwise the mistake will be compounded; only attempt this correction if the top infill's can be fitted.

The Sea Drains obscured by the bulkheads would be corrected once the bulkhead tabs had been removed.

Care needs to be taken when removing the top edge of the port Gun Port Pattern, ensuring that its height from the deck is identical to the starboard side Figure M8.

Figure M7 - Bottom of Gun Ports / Sea Drains removed using needle files.
Figure M7 - Bottom of Gun Ports / Sea Drains removed using needle files

Figure M8 - Port pattern edge made the same as the starboard edge
Figure M8 - Port pattern edge made the same as the starboard edge

Incorrect gluing of wood

This author is using two types of glue; the first was recommended by the model shop from which the kit was purchased, 'Titebond II - Weatherproof Premium Wood Glue'; the second is 'Evo-Stik Wood Adhesive', one that has been used for many modelling projects. 'Evo-Stik' is not water resistant, and providing a 'non-water resistant', adhesive is used, the following corrections can be made.

When a piece of wood has been glued, only to discover something is not correct, there is a simple method of 'ungluing' that is non destructive.

If the Captain's Cabin is being built, the internal side walls will have been planked; to ensure continuity, the interior of the forecastle is also planked, which is described in the guidance notes however, the planks will need to be in line Figure M9.

Figure M9 - Planks not in line
Fig. M9 - Planks not in line

As can be seen in Figure M10, the planks between the bulkheads are not in line; the two incorrect pieces will be removed. A piece of kitchen tissue is folded to cover the two pieces to be removed, and then water is dripped onto the tissue with a syringe Figure M10. This is left for about an hour, or until the pieces of wood can be eased out of position Figure M11

Figure M10 - Tissue is folded and placed on the piece of wood to be removed
Figure M10 - Tissue is folded and placed on the piece of wood to be removed

 

Figure M11 - Removed pieces of wood
Figure M11 - Removed pieces of wood

Part 1 PDF
Lloyd Matthews – Nov 2013 ©

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