H.M.S. Fly - Stern Windows

Introduction

It was the French in 1688 that developed a new method of making plate glass for windows that replaced the Mica and Muscovy glass that had been previously used on ships. This meant that the panes tended to be a lot larger than those of mica and changed the appearance of sterns quite considerably as the panes ran horizontally and vertically. Windows were sometimes fitted in the gunports in the area of the great cabin and wardroom as can be seen on a model of H.M.S. Royal George of 1756 and on H.M.S Victory at Portsmouth U.K. (Lavery 1987, p176-177).1

Note: Lavery, Brian, 'Part VIII Accommodation; 31 - The Structure and Fitting of Cabins' in The Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War, 1600-1815, Conway Maritime Press, 24 Bride Lane, Fleet Street, London EC4Y 8DR, pp. 172-178

This section will be split into three; Section 1 - Creating the stern window openings in the modified stern section. Section 2 - Making the panes of glass. Section 3 - Fitting the windows.


Section 1 - Making the stern window openings in the modified stern section.


In this section the work that went into the "Hull Modifications" is finalised by creating the openings for the stern windows. If this is being read prior to deciding whether to incorporate this modification into your model, it is advised that it is understood that the importance that was stressed in ensuring that the exact measurements around the stern section were maintained is now proven. There is absolutely no room for errors when modifying the hull as can be seen in Figure S14.

The excess ply is removed from the gun port patterns around the stern, Figure S1

Figure S1 - Excess ply removed from the gun port patterns
Figure S1 - Excess ply removed from the gun port patterns

Pt. No 114 is photocopied and the paper stern window pattern cut out, Figure S2. It can be seen that the window panes have been numbered and this will be used when they are being fitted.

Figure S2 - Pt. No 114 Stern Fascia photocopied and cut out
Figure S2 - Pt. No 114 Stern Fascia photocopied and cut out

Ensure that the guide line for the bottom of the stern fascia and the centre line are clearly marked on the modified stern section, Figure S3.

Figure S3 - Guide lines are marked clearly on the modified stern section
Figure S3 - Guide lines are marked clearly on the modified stern section

Once the stern windows have been cut out this part of the model will be quite fragile and susceptible to damage, so anything that can be done to strengthen the wood in this area is carried out. Firstly PVA adhesive is evenly painted on the stern section, Figure S4; the paper cut out copy of the stern fascia is carefully positioned on the stern ensuring it is central and gently 'dabbed' down into position Figure S5, and the top is folded over and fixed with adhesive, Figure S6.

Figure S4 - PVA adhesive painted onto the modified stern section
Figure S4 - PVA adhesive painted onto the modified stern section

Figure S5 - The paper stern fascia copy is positioned on the stern section
Figure S5 - The paper stern fascia copy is positioned on the stern section

 

Figure S6 - Stern fascia copy is turned over the top of the modified stern section
Figure S6 - Stern fascia copy is turned over the top of the modified stern section

To further reinforce the strength of this section a beam is cut, Figure S7, and fixed with adhesive above the inside of the stern windows, Figure S8. Ensure that it remains clear of the top of the window openings.

Figure S7 - Beam to reinforce the stern section
Figure S7 - Beam to reinforce the stern section

Figure S8 - Beam to reinforce the stern section
Figure S8 - Beam to reinforce the stern section

The stern window openings will be created by first chain drilling the windows however, a support was held beneath each as they were being drilled, Figure S9.

Figure S9 - Support held behind windows whilst chain drilling
Figure S9 - Support held behind windows whilst chain drilling

The centre window is chain drilled first using a 1.2 mm drill, Figure S10.

Figure S10 - The centre window is chain drilled
Figure S10 - The centre window is chain drilled

The centre part of the window is removed, Figure S11, but this is done with great care as it must be remembered that this modified stern section is reasonably delicate. It was Figure S9 - Support held behind windows whilst chain drilling
Figure S10 - The centre window is chain drilled found that the rubbing the drill 'up and down' against the pieces of wood connecting the holes, the centre of the window could be removed.

Figure S11 - The centre of the window is carefully removed
Figure S11 - The centre of the window is carefully removed

Needle files are used to file the excess wood away until the internal dimension of the window is achieved, Figure S12.

Figure S12 - Needle files are used to create the correct size for the window
Figure S12 - Needle files are used to create the correct size for the window

Below is a brief video for one of the stern windows being filed to size.

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Each of the stern windows are worked on in turn either side of the centre one and the end result is shown in Figure S13 and Figure S14. Please note that we have highlighted in Figure S14 the importance of the stern modification measurements.

Figure S13 - The completed stern windows in the stern modification
Figure S13 - The completed stern windows in the stern modification

Figure S14 - Internal view indicating the importance of the stern measurements
Figure S14 - Internal view indicating the importance of the stern measurements

A paper clip is used to hold the Stern Fascia Pt. No 114 against the modification to check that it fits correctly, Figure S15 and Figure S16.

Figure S15 - The Stern Fascia is checked against the stern modification
Figure S15 - The Stern Fascia is checked against the stern modification

Figure S16 - The Stern Fascia is checked against the stern modification
Figure S16 - The Stern Fascia is checked against the stern modification

This part of the hull is going to be quite susceptible to damage so a flat piece of scrap wood is shaped and used to provide protection for the stern windows as we have illustrated in Figure S17 and Figure S18.

Figure S17 - Protective cover fitted over the stern windows
Figure S17 - Protective cover fitted over the stern windows

Figure S18 - Protective cover fitted over the stern windows
Figure S18 - Protective cover fitted over the stern windows

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Thank you Lloyd © 2015